Audiology in Brief Physicists at the University of Twente in the Netherlands have recreated one of nature’s most sensitive sound detectors-the delicate hairs found on the cerci or abdomen of crickets. The goal of the research is to help scientists understand the complex physics that crickets use to perceive their surroundings, possibly ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   August 01, 2005
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   August 01, 2005
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, August 2005, Vol. 10, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.10102005.5
The ASHA Leader, August 2005, Vol. 10, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.10102005.5
Artificial Cricket Hairs
Physicists at the University of Twente in the Netherlands have recreated one of nature’s most sensitive sound detectors-the delicate hairs found on the cerci or abdomen of crickets. The goal of the research is to help scientists understand the complex physics that crickets use to perceive their surroundings, possibly leading to a new generation of cochlear implants. Crickets are thought to perceive energy flows as small as or even below thermal noise levels-the background “noise” caused by the Brownian motion of particles. The research was published in the July 2005 issue of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. The work was carried out by the MESA+ research institute at the University of Twente, as part of the European Union project CICADA (Cricket Inspired perCeption and Autonomous Decision Automata).
Tinnitus in China
Xinhua Online reports that 10% of China’s population-130 million people-have tinnitus, based on statistics gathered by the Chinese Disabled Persons’ Federation. Of the 130 million total, 100 million are under the age of 60. Hua Aingquan, an otolaryngologist from the People’s Hospital of Wuhan University in central China, said, “In most young patients, tinnitus is developed from too much stress.”
House Bill Retains EHDI Funding
A House appropriations subcommittee has approved a FY 2006 spending package for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services and Education that included $10 million for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI). Despite repeated attempts by the administration to eliminate funding for the Health Resources and Services Administration Universal Newborn Hearing program, the subcommittee agreed to include $10 million for the program, $208,000 more than the FY 2005 funding level. The EHDI program, under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is also expected to be retained at its funding level from last year or slightly higher. A more comprehensive analysis of the federal FY 2006 funding for health and education programs will be available in the future.
ASHA led the push for EHDI funding through coordinating a letter to all members of Congress signed by 33 national consumer groups, professional organizations, and manufacturers from both health care and education fields. ASHA will now focus on the Senate appropriations subcommittee and its work with EHDI. For more information, visit ASHA’s EHDI Advocacy Center.
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August 2005
Volume 10, Issue 10