Audiology in Brief The U.S. Department of Education (ED) has issued a new brochure for parents explaining the full range of options, including cochlear implants, for deaf and hard-of-hearing children. It is the first time the department has published guidance on cochlear implants. The brochure fulfills a policy directive from Congress issued ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   September 01, 2005
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   September 01, 2005
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, September 2005, Vol. 10, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.10122005.5
The ASHA Leader, September 2005, Vol. 10, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.10122005.5
New Brochure Includes Guidance on Cochlear Implants
The U.S. Department of Education (ED) has issued a new brochure for parents explaining the full range of options, including cochlear implants, for deaf and hard-of-hearing children. It is the first time the department has published guidance on cochlear implants.
The brochure fulfills a policy directive from Congress issued after reauthorization of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in December 2004. IDEA provides access to services and education for families and children with special needs.
Entitled “Opening Doors: Technology and Communications Options for Children With Hearing Loss,” the brochure is distributed by early intervention programs and is on the ED Web site.
How Fish Hear, Make Sounds
Cornell University researchers have learned how a common fish found along the West Coast can hum and hear outside sounds at the same time.The study marks the first time that scientists have found a direct line of communication between the part of a vertebrate’s brain that controls the vocal muscle system and the part of the ear that hears sound. The researchers believe that understanding the auditory system of the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus), a 6- to 10-inch fish found along the coastline from Alaska to California,will offer insights into how other vertebrates-including humans-hear. Because data indicates a relationship between the ear and the auditory and vocalization systems of the brain, it could help scientists understand some of the mechanisms that contribute to deafness. The study was published in the June 22 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.
Virginia Health Dept. Loans Hearing Aids to Children
The Virginia Department of Health is helping families with babies and toddlers who need hearing aids by loaning out the devices.
The Hearing Aid Loan Bank can let users borrow hearing aids and hearing-enhancement systems for up to six months, with the possibility of another six months, depending on a family’s decision.
The program is open to children 3 and under who have hearing loss confirmed by an audiologist. Their families also must be in the process of getting a permanent hearing aid. The program’s goal is to keep kids from falling behind because they didn’t get help right away.
Other states such as California, Florida, and Delaware, also have such programs. For more information about Virginia’s program, call Lisa Powley at the Blue Ridge Care Connection for Children at 434-924-0222.
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September 2005
Volume 10, Issue 12