Audiology in Brief The Board of Trustees of Self Help for Hard of Hearing People (SHHH) has voted to change the organization’s name to the Hearing Loss Association of America. The organization’s executive director, Terry D. Portis, said, “I believe that by updating our name and image we will be better able ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   December 01, 2005
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   December 01, 2005
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, December 2005, Vol. 10, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.10172005.5
The ASHA Leader, December 2005, Vol. 10, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.10172005.5
SHHH Approves New Name
The Board of Trustees of Self Help for Hard of Hearing People (SHHH) has voted to change the organization’s name to the Hearing Loss Association of America.
The organization’s executive director, Terry D. Portis, said, “I believe that by updating our name and image we will be better able to communicate our message and fulfill our mission. SHHH expects to complete the transition to the Hearing Loss Association of America in March 2006.” For more information visit www.hearingloss.org.
Hearing Aids Go Wireless
Starkey Laboratories has introduced ELI (Ear Level Instrument), a Bluetooth-enabling device that turns hearing aids into wireless headsets. ELI is designed to provide wireless connections between hearing aid wearers and the growing assortment of Bluetooth-compatible devices. The product is currently profiled in Time magazine’s “Coolest Inventions” issue.
When used with Bluetooth-enabled phones, ELI automatically overrides the hearing instrument’s microphone signal, essentially turning the instrument into a wireless cell phone headset. This improves the instrument’s sound quality and clarity while eliminating feedback and static problems.
ELI-the first in what will be a complete line of wireless applications from Starkey-is currently designed for behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing instruments and attaches to the base of the hearing instrument. ELI requires no power from the hearing instrument. It is powered by its own rechargeable lithium-ion battery. Each charge offers 140 hours in stand-by mode or 2.5 hours of continuous use. ELI is Bluetooth, CE, and FCC-compliant and has no line-of-sight requirements.
New Cochlear Implant Surgery Is Less Invasive
Researchers say a new minimally invasive cochlear implantation (MICI) procedure reduces risks of complications compared with the traditional technique. Instead of cutting a large scalp ear flap, doctors create a small “pocket” for the cochlear implant device. The advantages of avoiding a scalp flap include reduced risk of infection, tissue death, and flap failure, say researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The new minimally invasive surgery also leaves a smaller and less noticeable scar.
Using data collected from 176 patients, the Texas team calculated the total complication rate at 12.5% (including 4% major complications and 8.5% minor complications). Major complications included meningitis and facial nerve injury. Decreased tissue trauma associated with MICI allowed for earlier post-surgery programming or mapping of patients’ implants, compared to traditional cochlear implantation, the study said. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.
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December 2005
Volume 10, Issue 17