Hearing Aid Tax Credit Bill Making Progress Legislation to grant a tax credit for the purchase of certain hearing aids made progress in 2005 and ASHA hopes to build on that support in 2006. The Hearing Aid Tax Credit Act—H.R. 414 in the House, and S. 1060 in the Senate—would provide a tax credit of up to ... Policy Analysis
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Policy Analysis  |   March 01, 2006
Hearing Aid Tax Credit Bill Making Progress
Author Notes
  • Reed Franklin, is the director of ASHA’s Capitol Hill office.
    Reed Franklin, is the director of ASHA’s Capitol Hill office.×
Article Information
Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Policy Analysis
Policy Analysis   |   March 01, 2006
Hearing Aid Tax Credit Bill Making Progress
The ASHA Leader, March 2006, Vol. 11, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.PA.11042006.3
The ASHA Leader, March 2006, Vol. 11, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.PA.11042006.3
Legislation to grant a tax credit for the purchase of certain hearing aids made progress in 2005 and ASHA hopes to build on that support in 2006.
The Hearing Aid Tax Credit Act—H.R. 414 in the House, and S. 1060 in the Senate—would provide a tax credit of up to $500 per hearing aid once every five years for parents purchasing a hearing aid for a dependent child or for persons over 55 years of age.
On Jan. 26, 2005, H.R. 414 was introduced by Rep. Jim Ryun (R-KS). S. 1060 was introduced by Sen. Norm Coleman (R-MN) on May 18, 2005. As a result of the hard work on the part of the bill’s supporters, including many ASHA members who have been active in grassroots advocacy, H.R. 414 has gained 89 co-sponsors and S. 1060 has gained 14 co-sponsors.
“We are very proud of the progress this legislation has made,” said Roberta B. Aungst, ASHA’s vice president for professional practices in audiology. “We know that the legislative process is a slow one, and we feel good about the start we have made.”
On Nov. 16, 2005, at a hearing before the Subcommittee on Select Revenue Measurers of the House Ways and Means Committee, Rep. Ryun testified, “Many Americans who could be treated simply go without a hearing aid. In fact, while 95% of individuals with hearing loss could be successfully treated with hearing aids, only about 22% currently use them. Moreover, 30% of those with hearing loss cite financial restraints as the primary reason for not using a hearing aid.”
It is critical that ASHA members advocate with their elected officials in Washington. To see how you can help, visit ASHA’s Take Action Web site.
“We’ve made great progress, but we need to keep going,” Aungst said. “It is only with sustained action that we will see victory.”
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March 2006
Volume 11, Issue 4