Audiology in Brief ASHA recently commissioned Zogby International to conduct the first-ever national poll about public usage habits and attitudes toward popular technology. Two age groups, adults and high school students, were polled. The survey was expected to yield information about hearing loss risks. Individuals were asked what sort of devices they ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   March 01, 2006
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   March 01, 2006
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, March 2006, Vol. 11, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.11042006.5
The ASHA Leader, March 2006, Vol. 11, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.11042006.5
Press Event to Highlight Hearing Survey
ASHA recently commissioned Zogby International to conduct the first-ever national poll about public usage habits and attitudes toward popular technology. Two age groups, adults and high school students, were polled. The survey was expected to yield information about hearing loss risks.
Individuals were asked what sort of devices they used, including Apple iPods, other MP3 players, laptop computers, portable TV/DVD players, Walkmans or portable CD players, and cell phones. Questions included how long these devices were used in a session and at what volume.
Individuals also were asked if they used specially-designed headphones, if they were concerned about losing their hearing, and if they had experienced any symptoms of hearing loss.
The survey responses and their implications for the nation’s hearing health were to be discussed at a March 14 press conference at the National Press Club featuring an ASHA forum of experts.
Man Sues Apple Over Hearing Loss
A lawsuit filed in February claims that Apple’s iPod music player can cause hearing loss in people who use it. John Kiel Patterson of Louisiana filed the suit, which he wants certified as a class action. Apple has sold more than 42 million of the devices since 2001, including 14 million in the fourth quarter last year. The devices can produce sounds of more than 115 decibels.
Audiology Education Summit Held
The second Audiology Education Summit, “Strengthening Partnerships in Clinical Education,” was held in Phoenix on Feb. 3–5. Attendees included representatives from ASHA, the American Academy of Audiology, the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology and the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. The meeting focused on evolving practices in audiology doctoral programs, and included discussions about best practices. The Summit Planning Committee will issue a written report in a few months.
Pediatric Audiology Document
ASHA soon will adopt a new policy document. The Working Group of Pediatric Audiologists (Allan Diefendorf, chair; Diane Sabo, Anne-Marie Tharpe, Kathleen Beauchaine) has just completed its work in creating “Roles, Knowledge, and Skills: Audiologists Providing Clinical Services to Infants and Young Children Birth to 5 Years of Age.” This document is the second in a series designed to assist audiologists working with infants and young children identified with hearing loss. After approval, it will be posted on the ASHA Web site.
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March 2006
Volume 11, Issue 4