2006 Convention Builds Bridges The theme, “Building Bridges Through Communication,” defines everything about the 2006 ASHA Convention in Miami Beach-from the planning to the program-according to Convention co-chairs Albert De Chicchis and Lynn Flahive. “The theme came from a brainstorming session and was a group decision,” said De Chicchis. The choice proved fortuitous in ... ASHA Convention Coverage
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ASHA Convention Coverage  |   March 01, 2006
2006 Convention Builds Bridges
Author Notes
  • Susan Boswell, an assistant managing editor of The ASHA Leader, can be reached at sboswell@asha.org.
    Susan Boswell, an assistant managing editor of The ASHA Leader, can be reached at sboswell@asha.org.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / ASHA Convention Coverage
ASHA Convention Coverage   |   March 01, 2006
2006 Convention Builds Bridges
The ASHA Leader, March 2006, Vol. 11, 14-31. doi:10.1044/leader.ACC.11042006.14
The ASHA Leader, March 2006, Vol. 11, 14-31. doi:10.1044/leader.ACC.11042006.14
The theme, “Building Bridges Through Communication,” defines everything about the 2006 ASHA Convention in Miami Beach-from the planning to the program-according to Convention co-chairs Albert De Chicchis and Lynn Flahive.
“The theme came from a brainstorming session and was a group decision,” said De Chicchis.
The choice proved fortuitous in guiding the planning process. “We are looking at how different professions can work together in improving communication skills,” said Flahive. “We work with many other professions, and are hoping that the convention will bring in experts in other disciplines.”
The Convention recognizes the multidisciplinary nature of service delivery and will highlight advances in other fields-genetics, physics, and linguistics-that are affecting the practice of speech-language pathology and audiology. Convention attendees can look forward to gaining the most up-to-date information on genetic advances from keynote presentations and session strands with geneticists that will discuss the role of genetics in the early development of language and speech, and the role of genetics of different disorders such as auditory neuropathy and Usher’s syndrome. Other keynotes will include presentations on the growth, maintenance, and genetics of stereocilia and presentations on otoacoustic emissions.
“We’ll have a look at the science that drives the professions as well as clinical issues,” De Chicchis said.
The Convention Program Committee is also taking a look at ASHA’s strategic plan and incorporating those concepts into the convention planning, Flahive noted. Sessions will be built on a foundation of evidence-based practice and include information about cultural and linguistic diversity. As one example, Flahive noted that a strand of sessions on language disorders in adults will have a panel on cultural and linguistic diversity in people who’ve had a stroke or other neurologic pathology.
Students will find an increased number of sessions planned with them in mind. “Our hope is that in working with the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association, we will have an increase in sessions that will benefit students from attending,” Flahive said.
Audiology students will enjoy a 3D presentation of the central auditory nervous system and images of the middle and inner ear that are 3D computer reconstructions from MRI and CT scans.
The convention theme also permeates planning as the co-chairs build connections and convenience into the program. Flahive, an instructor at Texas Christian University and past-president and former vice president of the Texas Speech-Language-Hearing Association, helped plan one of the largest state association conventions which regularly draws 3,000 participants. Flahive also was executive director of the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association from 1998-2004.
Convention Web Site
To connect the work of all 22 topic coordinators, a centralized Web site was created that contains everything necessary for convention planning, including the dates, timelines and other information. “The Web site makes things easier to manage,” said Flahive.
Convention participants will also find the convention easier to navigate. The 16th Annual Research Symposium, sponsored by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), will be held as part of the main convention for the second time. On Saturday morning, symposium presenters will serve as the keynote speakers for audiology. Short courses will also be grouped together and conveniently located at the Loews Hotel.
State associations, colleges and universities, and other groups will host open houses in a centralized location on Friday evening following the awards ceremony, making it more convenient for everyone. And participants can look forward to a farewell gathering to enjoy Miami’s oceanside sunsets and say good-bye to old friends and new colleagues-before returning to Convention next year.
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March 2006
Volume 11, Issue 4