Audiology in Brief A new study shows chronic exposure to noise plus carbon monoxide increases hearing loss. The Université de Montréal study of 8,600 workers between 1983 and 1996 is the first to link carbon monoxide and hearing loss in humans. It is to be published in the Journal of the Acoustical ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   June 01, 2005
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   June 01, 2005
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, June 2005, Vol. 10, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.10082005.5
The ASHA Leader, June 2005, Vol. 10, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.10082005.5
Does Carbon Monoxide Exposure Increase Hearing Loss?
A new study shows chronic exposure to noise plus carbon monoxide increases hearing loss. The Université de Montréal study of 8,600 workers between 1983 and 1996 is the first to link carbon monoxide and hearing loss in humans. It is to be published in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America by early next year.
The study reports that workers exposed to carbon monoxide and noise levels above 90 dB had trouble hearing high frequencies (from three to six KHz). A larger shift in hearing loss was observed among workers with more than 25 years of noise exposure in the workplace. The study suggested hearing loss was caused by lower levels of oxygen in the bloodstream, which accelerates the deterioration of the sensory cells of the inner ear. Another theory is that both noise and carbon monoxide produce free radicals, which damage cells.
The U.S. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health estimates that nearly one million workers are exposed to significant levels of carbon monoxide. Those at risk include welders, fork lift operators, foundry workers, industrial mechanics, diesel engine operators, and miners.
AG Bell Awards $330,000 in Cochlear Implant Fellowships
The Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (AG Bell) has awarded $15,000 fellowships to 22 cochlear implant centers to train professionals in the field of cochlear implants and auditory rehabilitation. The fellowships will fund mentoring and educational development for professionals in the fields of clinical and research audiology, speech-language pathology, auditory-verbal therapy and the education of individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. The intent is to expand services for children and adults who are deaf.
Fellowships were awarded to cochlear implant centers in the United States and Canada to provide professionals up to 12 months of mentored work experience with a seasoned cochlear implant professional. Fellows will work in the areas of candidate evaluation, device fitting, auditory rehabilitation, counseling, and research.
The fellowships were made possible by grants from the Advanced Bionics Corporation and Cochlear Americas. For more information, visit the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Web site.
Are You an AARP Member?
If you receive the AARP Bulletin, ASHA has protested a serious mistake in the May 2005 issue (“Can You Hear Me Now?” on page 24). Tina Mullins of ASHA’s audiology division was quoted erroneously, which audiologists have brought to ASHA’s and AARP’s attention. ASHA has sent a letter to the editor of the publication, and also asked for a retraction. For more, see story on page 2.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
June 2005
Volume 10, Issue 8