State Legislative Scorecard The legislative year is winding down for the majority of state legislatures, and audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and their state speech-language-hearing associations can point to many statehouse successes. In Alabama and Georgia, new applicants for an audiology license will need a doctoral degree effective Jan. 1, 2007, due to legislation ... Policy Analysis
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Policy Analysis  |   June 01, 2006
State Legislative Scorecard
Author Notes
  • Charlie Diggs, director, state & consumer advocacy, can be reached at cdiggs@asha.org.
    Charlie Diggs, director, state & consumer advocacy, can be reached at cdiggs@asha.org.×
Article Information
Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Policy Analysis
Policy Analysis   |   June 01, 2006
State Legislative Scorecard
The ASHA Leader, June 2006, Vol. 11, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.PA3.11082006.4
The ASHA Leader, June 2006, Vol. 11, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.PA3.11082006.4
The legislative year is winding down for the majority of state legislatures, and audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and their state speech-language-hearing associations can point to many statehouse successes.
Audiology Licensure
In Alabama and Georgia, new applicants for an audiology license will need a doctoral degree effective Jan. 1, 2007, due to legislation signed by Govs. Bob Riley and Sonny Perdue on March 10 and May 5, respectively. Indiana, New Mexico, Ohio, and Oklahoma already have passed legislation for a similar requirement, demonstrating that a total of six states have anticipated ASHA’s 2012 mandate for a doctoral degree in audiology for its Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC).
Telepractice
The new Georgia law also establishes restrictions on the practice of audiology and speech-language pathology through telecommunications and information technologies that transmit information or data. The use of such technology is considered the practice of audiology or speech-language pathology in the state and requires a full Georgia license subject to the regulations of the licensing board.
The requirement will not apply to an audiologist or SLP in another state or country who provides consultation at the request of a state-licensed individual; to an audiologist or SLP licensed in another state or country who provides consultation without compensation and does not “alter[ing], adjust[ing], [or] manipulate[ing] hearing aid device controls”; or to consultation services to a graduate school located in the state and recognized by the board. The requirement of a full state license is consistent with the position of the National Council of State Boards of Examiners for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, a confederation of state licensing board representatives that supports the work of licensing boards and assists them in the regulation of audiology and speech-language pathology practice.
Salary Supplement
As reported in the May 2 issue, West Virginia school SLPs and audiologists who hold ASHA’s Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) will be eligible July 1 to receive a $2,500 annual salary supplement as well as reimbursement for certification application fees. Nationally certified guidance counselors in the schools are also included in this new law.
During the first year of implementation, salary supplements will be limited to a combined total of no more than 100 SLPs, audiologists, and counselors. In each subsequent fiscal year, up to 100 additional qualified recipients may receive the supplement. Criteria for selection of the particular individuals who will receive the supplement in a given year will be established by regulation and must prioritize the length of time certification has been held and the years of experience of the certificate holder.
West Virginia’s success brings to 10 the number of states that have enacted salary supplement legislation for school audiologists and/or school SLPs that is comparable to that received by master teachers certified by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Delaware, Indiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Nevada also provide a supplement. Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma have approved the supplement in principle but need state funds in order to implement the supplement. Rhode Island will pay for CCC application fees only.
Loan Forgiveness
In Wyoming, SLPs were specifically included in a list of health care providers with a state license who would be eligible for the loan repayment program from the state health department if they practice in underserved areas. Such a professional may not receive more than $10,000 per year in loan re-payment.
One-third of state legislatures are still in session. A more comprehensive report on state activity will appear in an early fall edition of The ASHA Leader after more legislatures have adjourned for the year.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
June 2006
Volume 11, Issue 8