Audiology in Brief Audiologist Robert Sweetow of University of California, San Francisco Medical Center says that no matter how good hearing aids are, patients will not achieve maximal communication skills without some sort of aural rehabilitation training. Sweetow and co-developer Jennifer Henderson-Sabes are trying to address the training need with an interactive ... News in Brief
Free
News in Brief  |   July 01, 2006
Audiology in Brief
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   July 01, 2006
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, July 2006, Vol. 11, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.11092006.5
The ASHA Leader, July 2006, Vol. 11, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.11092006.5
Interactive System Designed to Improve Hearing
Audiologist Robert Sweetow of University of California, San Francisco Medical Center says that no matter how good hearing aids are, patients will not achieve maximal communication skills without some sort of aural rehabilitation training.
Sweetow and co-developer Jennifer Henderson-Sabes are trying to address the training need with an interactive computer program called Listening and Auditory Communication Enhancement (LACE).
For four weeks, a user spends a half-hour, five days a week working with the computer program to help enhance listening skills. The user receives immediate feedback regarding correct comprehension and can monitor his or her improvement from the beginning of treatment. In addition, the patient’s audiologist can observe progress through a computer modem at a remote location.
“The program force-feeds the brain with exercises to extract speech from background noise and improve listening strategies,” Sweetow said. “My goal is that in three years, everyone who walks into an audiologist’s office also walks out with a therapy plan.”
Sweetow and Henderson-Sabes tested the training program at eight sites with about 80 individuals. Results showed improved ability to comprehend speech in a noisy environment along with increased confidence in difficult listening situations. For more information, contact Carol Hyman at chyman@pubaff.ucsf.edu.
Celebrities and Students Raise Money for Cochlear Implants
A group of Utah junior high students are getting help from celebrities in their work to raise money for their school’s janitor.
The students at Olympus Junior High School in Salt Lake City put together an online charity auction to help Terry Birch afford a cochlear implant that will allow the janitor who is deaf to hear. Birch and his wife, who is also deaf, have been overwhelmed by medical bills as she battles breast cancer.
Among the celebrities who contributed items are Alicia Keys, John Mayer, Denzel Washington, Matthew McConaughey, Elijah Wood, John Travolta, Ryan Cabrera and the Bravery. There are also tickets to the premiere of the Jack Black comedy “Nacho Libre,” as well as autographed items from Magic Johnson, Wayne Gretzky, Steve Young, and members of the world champion Pittsburgh Steelers. Details on the auction can be found at http://www.graniteschools.org/jr/olympus/.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
July 2006
Volume 11, Issue 9