Audiology in Brief The Acoustical Society of America (ASA) is advising U.S. schools against using sound field systems to overcome excessively noisy conditions in classrooms. Sound field systems amplify a teacher’s voice evenly throughout the classroom so every student can hear every word all of the time. While acknowledging that sound field ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   August 01, 2006
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   August 01, 2006
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, August 2006, Vol. 11, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.11102006.5
The ASHA Leader, August 2006, Vol. 11, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.11102006.5
Sound Field Not a Solution to Poor Acoustics
The Acoustical Society of America (ASA) is advising U.S. schools against using sound field systems to overcome excessively noisy conditions in classrooms. Sound field systems amplify a teacher’s voice evenly throughout the classroom so every student can hear every word all of the time.
While acknowledging that sound field systems have many valid uses in schools, ASA’s statement urges the use of the American National Standard Institute’s American National Standard Acoustical Performance Criteria, Design Requirements and Guidelines for Schools to improve classroom acoustics (ANSI/ASA S12.60-2002).
The standard provides guidelines for designing new classrooms or renovating old ones to reach acoustical performance criteria needed to make sounds intelligible for most participants in learning spaces. In addition, the standard sets specific criteria for background noise and reverberation times for unoccupied classrooms.
Protein Tied to Usher Syndrome May Be Hearing’s ‘Missing Link’
A protein associated with a disorder that causes deafness and blindness in people may be a key to unraveling one of the foremost mysteries of how we hear, says a study in the June 28 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. Scientists with the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH); and the University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom, have identified protocadherin-15 as a likely player in the reaction in which sound is converted into electrical signals. (Protocadherin-15 is a protein made by a gene that causes one form of type 1 Usher syndrome, the most common cause of deaf-blindness in humans.) The findings will not only provide insight into how hearing takes place at the molecular level, but also may help researchers understand why some people temporarily lose their hearing after being exposed to loud noise, only to regain it a day or two later.
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August 2006
Volume 11, Issue 10