Focusing on Yes/No Questions Renders Big Pay-Offs for AAC Users Children with severe, congenital speech impairments who use augmentative and alternative communication may benefit from direct intervention involving yes/no questions, shows new research published in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Led by University of Central Florida’s Jennifer Kent-Walsh, the study examined the effect of aided modeling—spoken and with a ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   April 01, 2015
Focusing on Yes/No Questions Renders Big Pay-Offs for AAC Users
Author Notes
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   April 01, 2015
Focusing on Yes/No Questions Renders Big Pay-Offs for AAC Users
The ASHA Leader, April 2015, Vol. 20, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.20042015.18
The ASHA Leader, April 2015, Vol. 20, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.20042015.18
Children with severe, congenital speech impairments who use augmentative and alternative communication may benefit from direct intervention involving yes/no questions, shows new research published in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.
Led by University of Central Florida’s Jennifer Kent-Walsh, the study examined the effect of aided modeling—spoken and with a speech-generating device—on three children, ages 4 to 6, with motor speech disorders.
The young participants began the direct-treatment program with no ability to produce yes/no questions (for example, “Is Jessie laughing?”) or “to be” declaratives (“Jessie is laughing”). And although the researchers acknowledge the study’s small sample size as a “potential limitation” and suggest future replications with more participants, all three children were able to generate a substantial number of accurate sentences after the intervention.
Also, all participants were able to generalize, to varying degrees, what they had learned to other sentence types.
Yes/no questions highlight sentence length and word order, areas of struggle for many children who use AAC. Learning to ask questions could give these children a more active role in communicating.
1 Comment
April 18, 2015
Megan Sutton
App for Asking Questions
What wonderful findings! I found that people with aphasia also benefitted from learning to ask questions, but found the grammar of yes/no questions difficult, so I designed an app called Question Therapy that combines Asking Therapy with Answering Therapy to address comprehension and expression of both yes/no and wh- questions. Hopefully adults and children who use AAC or speech to communicate will benefit from these exercises from Tactus Therapy. http://tactustherapy.com/app/question/
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
April 2015
Volume 20, Issue 4