New Version of Antibiotic Could Eliminate Risk of Hearing Loss A new version of a commonly used antibiotic could soon be available without the life-altering side effect of deafness, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Aminoglycosides are widely used to treat bacterial infections, administered worldwide to fight diseases such as pneumonia, peritonitis and sepsis, but ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   March 01, 2015
New Version of Antibiotic Could Eliminate Risk of Hearing Loss
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Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   March 01, 2015
New Version of Antibiotic Could Eliminate Risk of Hearing Loss
The ASHA Leader, March 2015, Vol. 20, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.20032015.15
The ASHA Leader, March 2015, Vol. 20, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.20032015.15
A new version of a commonly used antibiotic could soon be available without the life-altering side effect of deafness, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
Aminoglycosides are widely used to treat bacterial infections, administered worldwide to fight diseases such as pneumonia, peritonitis and sepsis, but large doses of the antibiotic drug come with permanent hearing loss in around 50 percent of patients due to selective sensory hair cell loss, the study notes. Kidney damage is also a common side effect.
Hearing loss has been seen as an unavoidable side effect of an otherwise effective antibiotic—aminoglycosides are low-cost, require no refrigeration and are highly effective at treating bacterial infections, especially those of unknown origins—but researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine set out to eliminate the side effect. Co-senior authors Anthony Ricci, a professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and Alan Cheng, an associate professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, eventually created the N1MS antibiotic.
After the researchers spent four years to produce five grams of N1MS, derived from sisomicin, a type of aminoglycoside, the new version of the antibiotic cured urinary tract infection in mice—without causing deafness. The mice also did not experience kidney damage.
Further research, the scientists say, could help create a larger family of aminoglycoside antibiotics that do not threaten hearing.
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March 2015
Volume 20, Issue 3