Retirement and Certification After being employed as an SLP in a school district for more than 30 years, I retired in June 2014. I was a card-carrying, dues-paying ASHA member and holder of my CCCs for the duration of my career. This fall I contacted ASHA to say I would not be renewing ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   March 01, 2015
Retirement and Certification
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Professional Issues & Training / Inbox
Inbox   |   March 01, 2015
Retirement and Certification
The ASHA Leader, March 2015, Vol. 20, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.20032015.4
The ASHA Leader, March 2015, Vol. 20, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.20032015.4
After being employed as an SLP in a school district for more than 30 years, I retired in June 2014. I was a card-carrying, dues-paying ASHA member and holder of my CCCs for the duration of my career. This fall I contacted ASHA to say I would not be renewing my membership due to my retirement. I also wanted to find out if there was anything else I needed to do procedurally in that regard.
Imagine my shock when I receive a form titled “Certificate of Clinical Competence Resigned Affidavit.” I strongly object to the wording of this form. To me, “resign” means quit, whereas “retire” means to conclude one’s professional career. I did not quit my profession—I retired.
Further, I object to my status of “not certified” being made available to the public unless it is also noted that I discontinued my membership due to my retirement. Without that clarification, some people might assume I had done something wrong to lose my certification.
I believe the form needs to accurately reflect a distinction between those who choose to leave the profession early and those of us who retired from our profession. Therefore, in good conscience, I do not feel I can sign this form.
Christine Eggert, Buffalo Grove, Illinois

ASHA offers a variety of certification and membership categories. In certification, a CCC-Retired status is available to those who are at least 65 years old and have 25 continuous years of certification; younger professionals who are not practicing may choose to continue to comply with certification maintenance standards and maintain active certification status. Those not in practice—who don’t provide services or supervise students or fellows—also have a reduced-cost, full-benefit option of membership without certification. Additionally, life membership is a less expensive option for certified and non-certified members who are at least 65 and have continuous membership of at least 25 years. Members may contact the Action Center (800-498-2071) for more information.

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FROM THIS ISSUE
March 2015
Volume 20, Issue 3