Using Social Media for Professional Advancement: Lessons Learned See how peers use Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and more to improve clinical skills, interact with colleagues, share insights and discover the latest research. Get Social
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Get Social  |   March 2015
Using Social Media for Professional Advancement: Lessons Learned
Author Notes
  • Tanya Coyle, MSc, S-LP(C), is a school-based SLP in Ontario, Canada who helped establish the speech-language community on Twitter in 2010. She has also authored speech-language and educational apps for iPad and is co-founder and director of social media for YappGuru
    Tanya Coyle, MSc, S-LP(C), is a school-based SLP in Ontario, Canada who helped establish the speech-language community on Twitter in 2010. She has also authored speech-language and educational apps for iPad and is co-founder and director of social media for YappGuru×
  • Mai Ling Chan MS, SLP, is an Arizona based clinician, is co-founder and ceo of YappGuru where she provides consulting, training and collaboration to other industry experts to promote mobile technology integration into special education and rehabilitation.
    Mai Ling Chan MS, SLP, is an Arizona based clinician, is co-founder and ceo of YappGuru where she provides consulting, training and collaboration to other industry experts to promote mobile technology integration into special education and rehabilitation.×
  • © 2015 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Get Social
Get Social   |   March 2015
Using Social Media for Professional Advancement: Lessons Learned
The ASHA Leader, March 2015, Vol. 20, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.GS.20032015.np
The ASHA Leader, March 2015, Vol. 20, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.GS.20032015.np
If you’re interested in using social media professionally but haven’t been following the column so far, take a moment to catch up. Read on for professional social media 101: a roundup of previous articles written by active members of our socmed (social media) community.
In our first column, we introduce you to what social media is and how some people conceptualize its use in the field. We liken it to one large and globally extending conference that never ends. We discuss how communicative disorders professionals are using various platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, blogs, and even Instagram. In case you want even more, there’s an article summarizing socmed platforms again and citing many ways in which to connect with ASHA and National Student Speech-Language Hearing Association by using them.
The column also includes articles on how professionals incorporate social media into their practice. We advise that you don’t have to feel obliged to interact on these platforms and can benefit by just reading, although you’ll miss the opportunity for networking. And your peers already on social media are very willing to interact with you if you want.
In addition, we share how professionals of all ages use social media and that there are ways to keep your personal life separate from your professional social media use.
Now, let’s talk about a great trend in social media that we haven’t yet covered: Research Tuesday! Ian A. Elliott, a visiting assistant professor in the University of Massachusetts Lowell’s criminal justice department, first used #ResearchTues in November 2012. He reports he “had a backlog of journal alerts at that time” and “decided to set aside an hour every Tuesday to go through them and used #ResearchTues as a way to mentally keep myself on schedule.”
Rachel Wynn, SLP and author/blogger of Gray Matter Therapy, began using this hashtag a year later and has since shaped this conversation into a more consistent and focused community. She invites bloggers and tweeters to “write about recent research that applies to their therapy practice” every second Tuesday of the month.
This is well received in the communicative disorders twittersphere, as evidenced by the steady stream of tweets linking to research-relevant blogs and comments, as well as ASHA’s official adoption of the practice in December 2014. Specific details on how #ResearchTues works are available on Rachel’s blog.
We hope you find this information helpful while you navigate available online communities. There’s more to come throughout this year. We will discuss how to use social media to find information, join conversations and share ideas about specific topics in speech pathology and audiology.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
March 2015
Volume 20, Issue 3