Apply for Mentored Teaching and Research Awards Apply by May 15 for two mentored teaching and research awards in communication sciences and disorders: one for students interested in faculty-researcher careers and one for junior-level faculty interested in advancing their careers. Since 2004, the two programs—Students Preparing for Academic and Research Careers and Advancing Academic-Research Careers—have helped approximately ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   March 01, 2015
Apply for Mentored Teaching and Research Awards
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Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   March 01, 2015
Apply for Mentored Teaching and Research Awards
The ASHA Leader, March 2015, Vol. 20, 56. doi:10.1044/leader.AN1.20032015.56
The ASHA Leader, March 2015, Vol. 20, 56. doi:10.1044/leader.AN1.20032015.56
Apply by May 15 for two mentored teaching and research awards in communication sciences and disorders: one for students interested in faculty-researcher careers and one for junior-level faculty interested in advancing their careers.
Since 2004, the two programs—Students Preparing for Academic and Research Careers and Advancing Academic-Research Careers—have helped approximately 200 students and junior-level faculty members develop and sustain successful academic-research careers.
Both programs recognize the importance of quality mentoring in the development of future CSD academic-research leaders. Several people have participated in both programs: SPARC awardees have become AARC awardees, and some awardees are paying it forward by now serving as mentors.
Megan Dunn Davison, assistant professor at Queens College, City University of New York, received a 2009 AARC award and became a 2014 SPARC mentor. “I received support and guidance on the entire process of being an academic-researcher,” Davison says. “I learned how to become a mentor myself. My AARC experience led me to think more carefully about how to support and foster the next generation of researchers by having one-on-one honest conversations and being exposed to the multiple roles of a faculty member, just as my mentor was doing for me.”
Krystal Werfel, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina, received a 2007 SPARC award and a 2013 AARC award and became a 2014 SPARC mentor.
“The experiences afforded by my SPARC award played the single largest role in my decision to pursue a PhD and a research career,” Werfel says. The subsequent AARC award, she says, provided opportunities not usually available to early academic-research careers. As a SPARC mentor, she is “excited about the opportunity to pass down the experiences to a future researcher.”
Students Preparing for Academic and Research Careers
SPARC focuses on fostering students’ interest in earning a PhD and pursuing an academic career. Up to 10 awards of $1,000 each will be given in 2015. CSD faculty are urged to encourage their students to apply for the award, which allows students to learn about teaching and research under the guidance of faculty mentors.
Several SPARC awardees have earned doctorates and are pursuing academic-research careers. Applicants must submit mentored teaching and research plans and, if selected, must complete interim and final reports.
Advancing Academic-Research Careers
AARC fosters retention and promotion of junior-level CSD faculty. Up to six early-career faculty will receive 2015 awards of $5,000 each. AARC applicants work with mentors to develop plans to improve their teaching and research skills, with specific teaching and research activities to be completed over 18 months under the mentors’ guidance.
Of the 51 faculty members who received their awards more than three years ago, 94 percent remain in academic positions today and 69 percent have been promoted to the associate professor level. In a recent survey, one awardee commented that the AARC award “formalized mentoring relationships and provided funds for me to travel to meet with my external research mentor to prepare an NIH R03 grant application. We spent two days working intensively on the specific aims and research plan. The grant was successfully funded on its first review.”
Because of the need for clinical practice research—which focuses on the delivery and outcomes of clinical services—to support evidence-based practice in CSD, two AARC awards are reserved for applications that focus on teaching and conducting clinical practice research.
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March 2015
Volume 20, Issue 3