Minnesota Speech-Language-Hearing Association Established: 1936 Website: www.msha.net Facebook: www.facebook.com/msha.net Members: 576 Contact: Jeremy D. Braun, president, 651-290-6292, president@msha.net MSHA does a great job of advocating for the professions of audiology and speech-language pathology. In the last year, MSHA supported an initiative to streamline special education paperwork, protected the speech-language ... State Spotlight
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State Spotlight  |   February 01, 2015
Minnesota Speech-Language-Hearing Association
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ASHA News & Member Stories / State Spotlight
State Spotlight   |   February 01, 2015
Minnesota Speech-Language-Hearing Association
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, 68. doi:10.1044/leader.STSP.20022015.68
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, 68. doi:10.1044/leader.STSP.20022015.68
Established: 1936
Website: www.msha.net
Members: 576
Contact: Jeremy D. Braun, president, 651-290-6292, president@msha.net
How are you making a difference in your members’ professional lives?
MSHA does a great job of advocating for the professions of audiology and speech-language pathology. In the last year, MSHA supported an initiative to streamline special education paperwork, protected the speech-language pathology license from infringement by other groups, introduced a bill to license speech-language pathology assistants, and continued to advocate for all of our clients. Specifically, MSHA is working to amend a bill that prevents Medicaid beneficiaries from using their speech-generating devices to access the Internet and e-mail.
What is your association’s proudest accomplishment?
One of the proudest moments in MSHA’s history was when our professions gained licensure. This achievement was the result of the tireless work of many dedicated volunteers, and that spirit of volunteerism continues as MSHA is currently proposing a license for SLPAs.
Other recent efforts include:
  • Ongoing legislative advocacy.

  • Community-building through our mentor program.

  • A leadership table at our annual convention, where members can chat with MSHA’s Executive Council.

  • Social events (MSHA Night Out at Chili’s).

  • MSHA on the Road (town hall forums across the state).

  • Receiving two grants from ASHA.

  • Development of resources, such as the “Talk With Me” manual that helps professionals work with clients from all cultures.

  • Creation of “Auditory Processing Disorders Assessment and Intervention: Best Practices,” which highlights conclusions from MSHA’s Task Force on Auditory Processing Disorders.

What is the most significant challenge, unique circumstance or pressing frustration facing communication sciences and disorders professionals in your state today?
Our biggest challenge is making sure others know what we do, why we do it and how we can assist clients/students in achieving their goals. Other challenges are the shortage of professionals, the burden of paperwork, and the push to do more with less. MSHA stands ready to assist our members with these issues, and we hold town hall events to discuss our challenges. Following the forums, MSHA advocates for members and the clients they serve at the capitol and around the state.
Do you have a particularly successful advocacy or recruitment strategy to share?
MSHA volunteers make personal phone calls to members who have let their membership lapse. This encourages members to renew, which keeps MSHA thriving!
What should every communication sciences and disorders professional in your state know about the association?
MSHA is advocating for audiologists and SLPs—both members and nonmembers alike—and we appreciate all the members we have. MSHA encourages all audiologists and SLPs in Minnesota to become members, as it is through member support that we can continue to advocate for the professions!
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FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2015
Volume 20, Issue 2