Spotlight on Special Interest Group 5, Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders As of October 2014, we have 774 affiliates. Our SIG has an ongoing focus on maximizing treatment for children with speech sound disorders related to clefts or other velopharyngeal function disorders. This is an issue that we always must highlight. A significant goal has been to provide practicing ... SIG Spotlight
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SIG Spotlight  |   February 01, 2015
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 5, Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders
Author Notes
  • SIG 5 coordinator, is professor emeritus in the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences at California State University, Northridge, and a clinician with the Ventura County Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic. judith.e.trost-cardamone@csun.edu
    SIG 5 coordinator, is professor emeritus in the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences at California State University, Northridge, and a clinician with the Ventura County Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic. judith.e.trost-cardamone@csun.edu×
Article Information
Special Populations / ASHA News & Member Stories / SIG Spotlight
SIG Spotlight   |   February 01, 2015
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 5, Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.20022015.np
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.20022015.np
How many affiliates does your SIG have?
As of October 2014, we have 774 affiliates.
Is there an important issue surrounding your SIG’s subject matter that you would like to highlight at this time?
Our SIG has an ongoing focus on maximizing treatment for children with speech sound disorders related to clefts or other velopharyngeal function disorders. This is an issue that we always must highlight. A significant goal has been to provide practicing SLPs (who may see clients with clefts infrequently) with the techniques and tools they need to design and deliver appropriate treatment (know what we can treat and what we cannot), establish a collaborative relationship with the cleft palate/craniofacial team SLP, and know how and when to refer clients for team care.
What upcoming events related to or sponsored by your SIG should everyone know about—chats, conferences or convention events?
SIG 5 will be sponsoring a Web chat on the treatment of speech sound disorders in mid- to late spring. This Web chat will be informative for everyone, from beginners to clinicians experienced in treating cleft palate speech, so watch for the announcement! SIG 5 also will have a poster on treatment at the 2015 Schools Conference. And of course, continue to post or view topics in our online community for informative and stimulating discussions on problem-solving for challenging cases and on various professional issues.
Which of your recent Perspectives articles is a must-read for CSD professionals, and why?
We have a number of “must-reads” among our more recent Perspectives. Two articles provide excellent and practical information for clinicians who want a review of important foundational/anatomy and physiology of velopharyngeal function and an evidenced-based guide to treating speech sound disorders in children with clefts.
  • The Basics of Velopharyngeal Function: A Brief Review for the Practicing Clinician” (October 2012) by David Jones provides an overview of the normal anatomy and function of the velopharyngeal mechanism, as well as how velopharyngeal closure interacts with aero-acoustic aspects of speech and the impact of impaired function. The article reviews the roles and actions of the muscles of velopharyngeal closure for a better understanding of the commonly observed patterns of velopharyngeal closure and also addresses the concept of velar. It also provides key suggestions for SLPs on how to conduct an oral mechanism examination and look for visible “hints” regarding impaired velopharyngeal function.

  • Don’t Blow This Therapy Session!” (October 2014) by Gregory Lof and Dennis Ruscello provides a thorough review of the reasons why blowing exercises and other non-speech oral motor exercises (NSOMEs) have a long history in the field despite the mounting evidence of their ineffectiveness. NSOMEs—especially blowing exercises for improving velopharyngeal closure or modifying speech production—should not be used in speech-language treatment. The article also offers evidence-based speech treatment approaches for remediation of the speech sound (compensatory) errors in children with cleft palate or other/non-cleft velopharyngeal dysfunction.

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FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2015
Volume 20, Issue 2