Social Support, Self-Concept Prove Key for Adults Who Stutter Increased family support and self-esteem/self-efficacy may help improve the quality of life—defined as individuals’ subjective perceptions of their satisfaction with functioning in several domains of daily life—for adults who stutter, regardless of how severe the stuttering, according to an article in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Oklahoma State University ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   February 01, 2015
Social Support, Self-Concept Prove Key for Adults Who Stutter
Author Notes
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   February 01, 2015
Social Support, Self-Concept Prove Key for Adults Who Stutter
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.20022015.16
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.20022015.16
Increased family support and self-esteem/self-efficacy may help improve the quality of life—defined as individuals’ subjective perceptions of their satisfaction with functioning in several domains of daily life—for adults who stutter, regardless of how severe the stuttering, according to an article in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.
Oklahoma State University researcher Michael P. Boyle analyzed results of a Web-based survey of 249 adults who stutter. The survey included measures of social support, empowerment, self-help support group participation, group identification and quality of life. After controlling for demographic and stuttering parameters, two factors—empowerment in the self-esteem/self-efficacy domain and social support from family—significantly predicted quality of life.
These results suggest that instilling or maintaining a client’s sense of self-esteem and self-efficacy, and maximizing the client’s family support, may positively influence quality of life in people who stutter, and that regardless of the stuttering severity, enhancing social support from the family and self-esteem and self-efficacy can be psychologically beneficial.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2015
Volume 20, Issue 2