February 2015 Rachel Wynn, a speech-language pathologist and patient-centered health care activist in Boulder, Colorado, was elected to the Board of Directors of the Colorado HealthOp, a nonprofit, member-governed health insurance company available on Colorado Health Exchange health insurance marketplace. Suzanne Boyce, professor of communication sciences and disorders at the ... People
Free
People  |   February 01, 2015
February 2015
Author Notes
Article Information
ASHA News & Member Stories / People
People   |   February 01, 2015
February 2015
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, 20-21. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.20022015.20
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, 20-21. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.20022015.20
Elected
Rachel Wynn, a speech-language pathologist and patient-centered health care activist in Boulder, Colorado, was elected to the Board of Directors of the Colorado HealthOp, a nonprofit, member-governed health insurance company available on Colorado Health Exchange health insurance marketplace.
In the news
Suzanne Boyce, professor of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati, was quoted in two reports on the use of ultrasound to remediate the /r/: a Nov. 17 segment on WVXU, a Cincinnati public radio station, and CBS affiliate WKRC-TV.
Named
Nan Bernstein Ratner, professor in the University of Maryland Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in recognition of her work in the psychology of language learning in typically developing children and children with communication disorders. As an ASHA liaison to AAAS, Ratner has coordinated sessions at its annual meetings on research developments in a variety of communication disorders. She also was recently named president-elect of the International Fluency Association.
Deaths
James “Red” LeRoy Aten, 83, on Nov. 9, 2014, in Laguna Beach, California, from natural causes following a series of strokes. During his time in the U.S. Navy as a tailhook pilot, Aten attended the University of Redlands, earning a bachelor’s in psychology and master’s in speech pathology. He then earned a doctorate in speech-language pathology at the University of Washington. Over a career of more than 50 years, he was on the faculty at San Jose State College; the University of California, Irvine; California State University, Long Beach; and the University of Denver. He also worked at the Seattle VA Medical Center and was chief of speech pathology and audiology at the Long Beach VA Hospital. He continued in private practice after his retirement. Aten was a consultant to the cleft palate team at Children’s Hospital and Craig Rehabilitation in Denver and a member of the Communication Sciences and Disorders Program Board of Councilors at Chapman University in Orange, California. With Deborah Swain, he published the Denver Auditory Phoneme Sequencing Test. A Fellow of ASHA and the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association, he was associate editor of the Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders and a member of the Academy of Aphasia.
Marie Love Johnson, 88, on Nov. 24, 2014, in Indianapolis. Johnson received a bachelor’s degree from Indiana University and a master’s degree from the University of Hartford. She was the first African American to receive a PhD in speech-language pathology from the University of Connecticut. Johnson began her career in the East Hartford public schools as the sole clinician in the school system. When she retired as director of the East Hartford speech and hearing program, she led a staff of 17 SLPs, a teacher of the deaf, and seven paraprofessionals. During her tenure as president of the Connecticut Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the state passed legislation mandating licensure for SLPs and audiologists in all work settings in Connecticut—the first state universal licensure law in the nation. As ASHA’s vice president for administration, she played a major role in the development of ASHA’s policies to promote the recruitment and retention of master’s-level clinicians from African-American and other ethnic minority backgrounds. Johnson was co-founder and chief executive officer of the Shadybrook Language and Learning Center, a summer residential experience for children with speech-language impairments.
Darwin Knapp, 89, on Nov. 28, 2014, at Country Meadows in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. After serving in the U.S Marines during World War II, Knapp received a bachelor’s in psychology and speech and hearing therapy from the University of Akron and a master’s degree in audiology and speech pathology from Case Western Reserve University. He worked at the Delaware Hospital in Wilmington before joining the Pennsylvania Department of Health as program chief for hearing and speech services. He was an active member of the Delaware Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and served as president of the Directors of Speech and Hearing Programs in State Health and Welfare Agencies.
Gerald M. Siegel, 82, of natural causes, on Nov. 17, 2014, in Minneapolis. Siegel, professor emeritus at the University of Minnesota, received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in speech pathology from Brooklyn College and his PhD in speech pathology and audiology at the University of Iowa. He served on the faculties of North Dakota State University, University of Kansas and University of Minnesota. During the 1960s and 70s, he and Richard Martin conducted groundbreaking studies on stuttering—known as the Minnesota Fluency Studies—that helped to transform stuttering treatment, especially in children. He published more than 120 papers and co-authored a textbook. He was an editor of ASHA Monographs and a member of the ASHA Publications Board. An ASHA Fellow and Honors recipient, he also received an ASHA Editor’s Award, a distinguished teaching award from the University of Minnesota, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Minnesota Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
1 Comment
April 12, 2015
Shirley Morganstein
A loss is forever
Just learning of this today, I am saddened by the loss of a wonderful teacher, writer, and mensch.
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2015
Volume 20, Issue 2