Florida ELL Students Get an Extra Catch-Up Year Immigrant students in Florida now have two years—instead of one—after entering public schools before they must take state achievement tests. U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan granted Florida the waiver in December in response to a recent influx of students from Central America who fled violence in their countries. Miami-Dade County, ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   February 01, 2015
Florida ELL Students Get an Extra Catch-Up Year
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School-Based Settings / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   February 01, 2015
Florida ELL Students Get an Extra Catch-Up Year
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB7.20022015.14
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB7.20022015.14
Immigrant students in Florida now have two years—instead of one—after entering public schools before they must take state achievement tests.
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan granted Florida the waiver in December in response to a recent influx of students from Central America who fled violence in their countries. Miami-Dade County, for example, recently added about 2,000 children from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala to its 77,000 English-language learners.
The Miami-Dade County English-language learning population is larger than the total student population of many school districts.
For years, ELL students in Florida who entered the U.S. school system had one year to catch up to their peers before they had to start taking state achievement tests.
Under those rules, many immigrant children underperformed on the tests after a year of instruction, lowering school and district test scores—and the federal funding tied to performance. Now, their test scores will count only after two years.
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February 2015
Volume 20, Issue 2