Way to Grow I commend ASHA for “Way to Grow” (January 2015, on.asha.org/alo0115-grow-grads), which brings to light challenges in clinical education—a topic that raises much concern year after year. I understand the reasons why so few students are accepted each year, but I also see that we need to grow academically and professionally. ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   February 01, 2015
Way to Grow
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Professional Issues & Training / Inbox
Inbox   |   February 01, 2015
Way to Grow
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.20022015.6
The ASHA Leader, February 2015, Vol. 20, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.20022015.6
I commend ASHA for “Way to Grow” (January 2015, on.asha.org/alo0115-grow-grads), which brings to light challenges in clinical education—a topic that raises much concern year after year. I understand the reasons why so few students are accepted each year, but I also see that we need to grow academically and professionally.
I recently finished my first semester as an AuD student at Pacific University in Hillsboro, Oregon. Pacific’s fairly new program (my class is the third cohort) is already pushing the envelope in an attempt to radicalize AuD education. Our accelerated, three-year program offers a rigorous curriculum that is innovative and lush in unique clinical opportunities and experiences. I believe our larger classes (20–24) create a rich, diverse sense of community among the students. Our clinical directors have created meaningful, lasting connections with health care professionals around the greater Portland area to create a wide variety of clinical experiences for us. In our state-of-the-art Audiology Simulation Lab—one of just a few nationwide—we can perform full diagnostic test batteries 24/7 to increase our level of competency and confidence in clinical and academic arenas. I’m proud to be part of this new era of communication sciences and disorders education.
Change and challenge, as many of us know, walk hand in hand, but current and developing medical and health care professionals must welcome and embrace change, because the future of our professions and the quality of patient care depend upon it. Bravo, Leader, on an excellent read!
Joshua Huppert, Beaverton, Oregon

Thank you for your response. We hope the January series of articles on clinical education sparks discussion and implementation of innovative ways to ease the CSD training bottleneck.

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FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2015
Volume 20, Issue 2