Subjective Hearing Screen for Teens Proves Unreliable Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to a study in the Journal of Medical Screening, a result that suggests objective hearing tests be used for this age group. Current American Academy of Pediatrics standards for pediatric preventive care recommend screening ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   January 01, 2015
Subjective Hearing Screen for Teens Proves Unreliable
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Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   January 01, 2015
Subjective Hearing Screen for Teens Proves Unreliable
The ASHA Leader, January 2015, Vol. 20, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.20012015.15
The ASHA Leader, January 2015, Vol. 20, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.20012015.15
Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to a study in the Journal of Medical Screening, a result that suggests objective hearing tests be used for this age group.
Current American Academy of Pediatrics standards for pediatric preventive care recommend screening adolescents with subjective questions and following up with objective hearing tests for those at high risk of hearing loss.
However, when Deepa L. Sekhar and colleagues from the Penn State College of Medicine and Bloomsburg University compared the results of subjective and objective screenings of 11th-grade students, they found that neither the AAP questions nor additional questions assessing other potential risk factors for hearing loss were associated with hearing loss.
The standard state-mandated hearing test—in which students raise a hand when they hear a tone—had a sensitivity of only 13 percent for adolescent hearing loss. A hearing test developed by the researchers to better detect high-frequency noise-related hearing loss had 100 percent sensitivity.
A 2010 study using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey showed that one in five 12- to 19-year olds have hearing loss, and that most of them have high-frequency hearing loss, which may be related to hazardous noise exposure from, for example, personal listening devices, concerts, ATVs and firearms. School hearing tests screen mainly for low-frequency hearing loss, most often seen in younger children in association with frequent ear infections and fluid in the ear.
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January 2015
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