January 2015 Heather Clark was appointed chair of the Division of Speech Pathology in the Department of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. She joined the Mayo staff in 2012 after serving on the faculty at Appalachian State University … Richard I. Zraick was appointed professor and chair in ... People
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People  |   January 01, 2015
January 2015
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Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News & Member Stories / People
People   |   January 01, 2015
January 2015
The ASHA Leader, January 2015, Vol. 20, 20-21. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.20012015.20
The ASHA Leader, January 2015, Vol. 20, 20-21. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.20012015.20
Appointed
Heather Clark was appointed chair of the Division of Speech Pathology in the Department of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. She joined the Mayo staff in 2012 after serving on the faculty at Appalachian State University … Richard I. Zraick was appointed professor and chair in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders in the College of Health and Public Affairs at the University of Central Florida. Previously, Zraick was a professor of speech-language pathology at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, where he held appointments in the Departments of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and Geriatrics.
In the news
Suzanne Boyce, a professor of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati, was quoted in an Oct. 20 article in the Wall Street Journal on the use of ultrasound to remediate the /r/ … Peter Scheifele, associate professor of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati and director of the UC Facility for the Education and Testing of Canine Hearing Laboratory for Animal Bioacoustics (FETCH~LAB), was featured in a Nov. 12 interview on WCPO.com, the local ABC affiliate, about his ongoing project to monitor the hearing of military canines.
Deaths
Marion P. Downs, 100, on Nov. 13, 2014, in Dana Point, California. A pioneer in the field of pediatric audiology, Downs demonstrated through her 1960s trailblazing work at the University of Colorado School of Medicine that babies with hearing loss could and should be treated and fitted with hearing aids as young as possible. Her revolutionary findings inspired the movement to make universal newborn hearing screening the standard throughout the United States and much of the rest of the world. Downs earned her bachelor’s degree—with studies interrupted by marriage and raising three children—from the University of Minnesota, and subsequently earned a master’s in audiology at the University of Denver. She immediately joined the university’s faculty, where she taught audiology and directed the audiology clinic for eight years. In 1959, she moved to the University of Colorado School of Medicine to work as an audiologist at its new otolaryngology clinic, where she remained until retiring in 1982. There, she developed more effective ways to test newborns’ hearing and began to fit hearing aids on infants as young as 6 months. At the same time, she worked to convince her peers to adopt her newborn test in hospitals and to fit hearing aids on infants as soon as possible. Downs co-authored two of the classic texts in pediatric audiology: “Hearing in Children,” written with Jerry Northern, has been published in six editions and translated into several languages, and “Auditory Disorders in School Children,” co-authored with Ross Roeser, is in its fourth edition. Downs, an ASHA Fellow and Honors recipient, received many awards for her achievements from the American Academy of Audiology, American Auditory Society, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American Medical Association, and International Audiology Society. She received the Secretary’s Highest Recognition Award from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; and awards from the University of Minnesota and Ministry of Health of South Vietnam for teaching audiology in that country. She held honorary doctorates from the University of Colorado and University of Northern Colorado. In 2005, the University of Colorado Medical Center named the Marion Downs Hearing Center after her. Survivors include three children—Sara Voorhees, Jody Pike and George Downs—16 grandchildren and 26 great-grandchildren.
Sylvia Onesti Richardson, 94, on Oct. 24, 2014, in Tampa, Florida. Richardson, a past ASHA president, was a pediatrician, speech-language pathologist and educator. She earned a bachelor’s degree in speech and drama at Stanford University, a master’s degree in education from Columbia University, a medical degree from McGill University, and an honorary doctor of literature from Emerson College. A passionate advocate for children with language and learning disorders, Richardson was on the faculty at Harvard University, University of Oklahoma, University of Cincinnati and University of South Florida. She established the first speech-language clinic in any U.S. children’s hospital at Boston Children’s Medical Center in 1949. While at the University of Oklahoma, she created the Child Study Center and became involved in Montessori educational methods for children with learning disabilities. In Cincinnati, she was a founding member of the Hamilton County Diagnostic Center for Children With Learning Disabilities. She chaired the Professional Advisory Board of the Learning Disabilities Association; served as president of the Multidisciplinary Academy of Clinical Education and of the International Dyslexia Association and its Florida chapter; was a founding board member of the American Montessori Society; and chaired the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities. An ASHA Honors recipient, she was 1964 Oklahoma Woman of the Year and received awards from the International Dyslexia Association, Columbia University Teachers College, the New England Network for Learning Disabilities and the Learning Disability Association. Survivors include her brother, Silvio Onesti; her sons, William and Christopher; and six grandchildren.
Glyndon D. Riley, 84, on Sept. 2, 2014. Riley received his master’s degree from Pepperdine University and his PhD in speech pathology from Florida State University. An internationally recognized stuttering clinician and researcher, Riley began teaching at California State University-Fullerton, becoming a full professor in 1974 and emeritus in 1986. During 40 years in university settings, Riley taught courses on stuttering, mentored many graduate students, advanced neurologically based theories of stuttering, and founded Rileys Speech and Language Institute in Santa Ana, California, with his wife Jeanna, a psychologist. Their research led to breakthroughs in diagnosis and treatment, including the development of the Stuttering Severity Instrument and the Speech Motor Training Program. Riley founded the nonprofit Center for Children Who Stutter on the CSU-Fullerton campus. An ASHA Fellow, Riley received the Honors of the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Malcolm Hough Fraser Community Service Award from the Stuttering Foundation of America. Survivors include his wife, Jeanna, a sister, four children and three grandchildren.
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January 2015
Volume 20, Issue 1