Districts See Fewer IDEA Due-Process Hearings The number of due-process hearings related to the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act declined substantially nationwide from 2004 to 2012, especially in three jurisdictions—New York, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C.—because more parents and districts use alternative means of conflict resolution, according to the Government Accountability Office. The number fell from ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   December 01, 2014
Districts See Fewer IDEA Due-Process Hearings
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School-Based Settings / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   December 01, 2014
Districts See Fewer IDEA Due-Process Hearings
The ASHA Leader, December 2014, Vol. 19, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB4.19122014.12
The ASHA Leader, December 2014, Vol. 19, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB4.19122014.12
The number of due-process hearings related to the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act declined substantially nationwide from 2004 to 2012, especially in three jurisdictions—New York, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C.—because more parents and districts use alternative means of conflict resolution, according to the Government Accountability Office.
The number fell from 7,000 in academic year 2004–2005 to 2,262 in academic year 2011–2012.
A due-process hearing is a formal conflict resolution method, and its use is a key indicator of serious disputes between parents and school districts under IDEA. The 2004 IDEA reauthorization, however, added options for conflict resolution—such as mediation and resolution meetings—in which parents and districts meet to discuss a dispute but don’t necessarily involve lawyers. In most states, according to the report, these alternative methods have been useful.
According to a 2011 study by the U.S. Department of Education, the most common dispute topic was whether schools were providing an appropriate educational environment for certain students, followed by whether schools carried out the specifics of the Individualized Education Program; the types of special education and related services specific children needed; and eligibility for IDEA services.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
December 2014
Volume 19, Issue 12