11 CSD Personnel Preparation Projects Receive Grants ASHA-member speech-language pathologists and audiologists at 11 universities have received grants from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs to help recruit and train communication sciences and disorders clinicians who work with children with disabilities. OSEP awarded five grants to minority-serving institutions: Yolanda Keller-Bell and Maureen ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   December 01, 2014
11 CSD Personnel Preparation Projects Receive Grants
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Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   December 01, 2014
11 CSD Personnel Preparation Projects Receive Grants
The ASHA Leader, December 2014, Vol. 19, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.19122014.10
The ASHA Leader, December 2014, Vol. 19, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.19122014.10
ASHA-member speech-language pathologists and audiologists at 11 universities have received grants from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs to help recruit and train communication sciences and disorders clinicians who work with children with disabilities.
OSEP awarded five grants to minority-serving institutions:
  • Yolanda Keller-Bell and Maureen Short at North Carolina Central University in Durham will enroll 22 students in the master’s program, designed to prepare the students to serve children with or at risk for developmental disabilities, particularly those from diverse backgrounds.

  • Suzanne Moineau at California State University San Marcos will provide specialized training to 50 master’s-level SLPs on assessing and treating low-incidence communication disorders associated with craniofacial anomalies in children from multilingual and multicultural backgrounds.

  • Brandi Newkirk-Turner at Jackson State (Mississippi) University will provide an enhanced master’s in speech-language pathology to prepare students, including those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, to provide language and literacy services to high-need and culturally and linguistically diverse students.

  • Kay Payne and Martine Elie at Howard University in Washington, D.C., will recruit, support, train and graduate 18 SLPs to work as school-based clinicians with a focus on multicultural and multilingual populations.

  • Connie Summers and Vanessa Mueller at the University of Texas at El Paso will recruit 24 students to the master’s program in speech-language pathology with a specialized bilingual certificate, and place the students in school-based positions.

Three grants are designed to prepare clinicians to provide “related services” to children with disabilities:
  • Through a distance learning program, Nancy Creaghead and Sally Disney at the University of Cincinnati will prepare 50 SLPs to provide services in high-need schools in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia.

  • Ilsa Schwarz and Jillian McCarthy at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Knoxville will include 32 speech-language pathology students in its aural habilitation concentration to improve language and literacy outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  • Lora Valente and William Clark at Washington University in St. Louis will train 16 AuDs with a focus on services to children (birth–21 years) and families.

Three grants will fund programs for doctoral students:
  • C. Melanie Schuele and Stephen Camarata at Vanderbilt University in Nashville will prepare six SLPs for academic-research careers in child language and literacy who will be leaders in teaching, service, and research and development.

  • A program led by Elizabeth Peña and Lisa Bedore at the University of Texas at Austin will increase the number of doctoral and post-doctoral communication sciences and disorders faculty who have expertise in service delivery to children who are English-language learners.

  • Carla Jackson at Florida State University in Tallahassee will provide training in bilingual oral language and literacy development and disorders to six doctoral students.

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December 2014
Volume 19, Issue 12