Parental Participation Is ‘Sound Advice’ I appreciated the article “The Powered-Up Parent” about parent participation when working with preschool children who stutter in schools. Children do not operate in vacuums and Mr. Reitzes’s call for parental participation in therapy and following through at home is not only sound advice, but is consistent with evidence-based practice. ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   November 01, 2014
Parental Participation Is ‘Sound Advice’
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Inbox
Inbox   |   November 01, 2014
Parental Participation Is ‘Sound Advice’
The ASHA Leader, November 2014, Vol. 19, 6-7. doi:10.1044/leader.IN6.19112014.6
The ASHA Leader, November 2014, Vol. 19, 6-7. doi:10.1044/leader.IN6.19112014.6
I appreciated the article “The Powered-Up Parent” about parent participation when working with preschool children who stutter in schools. Children do not operate in vacuums and Mr. Reitzes’s call for parental participation in therapy and following through at home is not only sound advice, but is consistent with evidence-based practice. His suggestions regarding changing the culture of the school and including other related professionals made a lot of sense. The child who stutters will benefit more when everyone is on the same page.
Creating partnerships with parents, where they can develop a better understanding of stuttering and learn how they can help their child become a more effective and competent communicator, is as critical as intervention with the child. I remember one parent’s comment following successful therapy with his son when he told me he wondered who benefited from the therapy more, his son or him. Mr. Reitzes effectively employed data-based, peer-reviewed sources from a variety of research studies. As he mentioned, “no one treatment works for all,” and then he illustrated common elements from the different therapies. Mr. Reitzes’s suggestion to individualize treatment to the child and his family is not only consistent with the evidence in our field, but is supported by evidence from research conducted in the area of psychotherapy (for example, Bruce B. Wampold’s Common Factors Model in his 2001 “The Great Psychotherapy Debate: Models, Methods, and Findings”). Thanks to ASHA and to Mr. Reitzes for such valuable information!
Charlie Osborne, Stevens Point, Wisconsin
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November 2014
Volume 19, Issue 11