Required Reading The article on parent involvement for children who stutter should be required reading for all new clinicians and students. As a board-certified specialist who has worked with children who stutter for almost 15 years, the one constant that I have found over the years is the importance of parent involvement.Giving ... Inbox
Free
Inbox  |   November 01, 2014
Required Reading
Author Notes
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Inbox
Inbox   |   November 01, 2014
Required Reading
The ASHA Leader, November 2014, Vol. 19, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN5.19112014.6
The ASHA Leader, November 2014, Vol. 19, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN5.19112014.6
The article on parent involvement for children who stutter should be required reading for all new clinicians and students. As a board-certified specialist who has worked with children who stutter for almost 15 years, the one constant that I have found over the years is the importance of parent involvement.Giving parents meaningful clinical strategies is paramount for preschool children. As a parent myself, there is nothing that frustrates me more than the standard “Oh, 80 percent of children who stutter will recover” response that we, as a profession, mistakenly and cold-heartedly often provide. Reitzes’s article provides parents with evidence-based strategies that allow them to take meaningful action, rather than simply continue to wait and worry.
Through my own work in “community-centered” treatment for stuttering, I have found that success in the therapeutic process for children who stutter depends not only on the child, but the family and the community (teachers, coaches, etc.) that surround the child in his everyday experiences.
One can visit discussion groups or social media sites and easily find the need for more education on stuttering treatment for speech-language pathologists. When questions are asked about individual cases, many responses focus on programs or manuals that are not individualized for the client, without knowing any of the unique characteristics of the client. That type of thinking does not equate to evidence-based practice. Congratulations to Reitzes for providing suggestions while still allowing clinicians to individualize.
Craig E. Coleman, Hurricane, West Virginia
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
November 2014
Volume 19, Issue 11