Get Your CSD Tweet On Nervous about joining the speech-language pathologists and audiologists talking shop on Twitter? Don’t be. They can’t wait to hear your thoughts. Get Social
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Get Social  |   November 2014
Get Your CSD Tweet On
Author Notes
  • Aubrey Taylor Klingensmith, MS, CCC-SLP, works with adults in an acute-care hospital and skilled nursing facilities in Phoenix. She is a founding partner and the director of website content development for YappGuru, a company that helps clinicians use apps in their practice. Her blog, Speechie Apps, focuses on enhancing traditional therapy via technology. Find her on Twitter at @atklingensmith. klingensmith@gmail.com
    Aubrey Taylor Klingensmith, MS, CCC-SLP, works with adults in an acute-care hospital and skilled nursing facilities in Phoenix. She is a founding partner and the director of website content development for YappGuru, a company that helps clinicians use apps in their practice. Her blog, Speechie Apps, focuses on enhancing traditional therapy via technology. Find her on Twitter at @atklingensmith. klingensmith@gmail.com×
  • © 2014 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Get Social
Get Social   |   November 2014
Get Your CSD Tweet On
The ASHA Leader, November 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.GS.19112014.np
The ASHA Leader, November 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.GS.19112014.np
When I first joined Twitter in 2011, I did a whole lot of “lurking” and absolutely no tweeting. Part of this was because I was trying to figure out how the site even worked, but mostly I was just intimidated by this incredible group of SLPs, audiologists and students who seemed to know everything and everyone.
I joined right before the 2011 ASHA Convention, and Twitter was blowing up with tweets about which hotels people were staying in, what sessions they were attending (scratch that—what sessions they were presenting at), and who they were planning to meet up with.
I started following quite a few of them, but they didn’t initiate any conversations with me, probably because I didn’t initiate any with them and had zero tweets! I worried that this was an established, tight-knit clique. After all, many of them had years of experience professionally and on Twitter (not to mention thousands of followers and tens of thousands of tweets). As a brand-new clinician, I wasn’t sure I would be accepted or have anything valid to add.
Luckily, I gained a little confidence, and I began tweeting some articles I found interesting. Then I was sharing my own blog posts and commenting on other people’s tweets. I even worked up the courage to ask people for treatment advice. When I began engaging with other tweeters, it was amazing how quickly what I thought was a “tight-knit clique” opened up and began engaging with me. By the following year I was headed to the convention to meet up with the dynamic set of people I had been interacting with online for the past year.
Obviously, I no longer think of the Twitter #SLPeeps and #AudPeeps as the impermeable elite, and I recommend Twitter to anyone who will listen. But I’m sure it’s still a daunting process for anyone just joining, so here are my recommendations for seamlessly becoming an active group member.
Follow people with similar interests. Search Twitter for topics like “articulation,” “dysphagia” or “AAC.” You’ll see at a glance who tweets about these things the most. Follow them and engage in conversation with them. The overwhelming majority will respond and enjoy finding another person who shares their interests. After all, that is likely the entire reason they are even on Twitter.
Re-tweet and respond to others. Those people you just followed? Share their tweets. Ask them for their opinions on thought-provoking topics. It’s a totally different way of interacting than more formal forums or even e-mail, so it might feel uncomfortable at first, but you’ll find the exchanges come quickly and naturally.
Tweet related content. Share any interesting research articles, blog posts and news related to the profession.
Feel free to engage on a formal and informal level. Some people are most comfortable with strictly formal tweets (such as sharing research articles), but much of the fun and relationship-building happens with “real-life” conversations—the discussions about where to stay for convention, or the goof you made this morning spilling barium all over yourself, or the awesome new strategy you tried that led to a great treatment success story.
SLPs and audiologists on Twitter are there because they want to interact with people like you. Regardless of where you are in your professional journey, you have a unique perspective to offer. Don’t be intimated by the depth and variety of the group—just jump right in and add to it!
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FROM THIS ISSUE
November 2014
Volume 19, Issue 11