Spotlight on Special Interest Group 1, Language Learning and Education SIG 1 is the third-largest SIG, with 5,024 affiliates. My primary focus as a practitioner and a researcher has always been on measuring and treating language deficits. I became active in SIG 1 when I found myself wanting to give back to the profession and support the development ... SIG Spotlight
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SIG Spotlight  |   October 01, 2014
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 1, Language Learning and Education
Author Notes
  • LaVae M. Hoffman, PhD, CCC-SLP, SIG 1 coordinator, is an associate professor in the Communication Disorders Program at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. lmh3f@virginia.edu
    LaVae M. Hoffman, PhD, CCC-SLP, SIG 1 coordinator, is an associate professor in the Communication Disorders Program at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. lmh3f@virginia.edu×
Article Information
Development / ASHA News & Member Stories / SIG Spotlight
SIG Spotlight   |   October 01, 2014
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 1, Language Learning and Education
The ASHA Leader, October 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.19102014.np
The ASHA Leader, October 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.19102014.np
How many affiliates does SIG 1 have?
SIG 1 is the third-largest SIG, with 5,024 affiliates.
Why did you originally choose to affiliate with SIG 1?
My primary focus as a practitioner and a researcher has always been on measuring and treating language deficits. I became active in SIG 1 when I found myself wanting to give back to the profession and support the development of other practitioners. SIG 1, Language Learning and Education, was a natural fit and offered many opportunities to connect with other professionals who were interested in the same topics and concerns. I love being part of this community.
What is the most important issue surrounding SIG 1’s subject matter right now?
SIG 1 is concerned with a wide range of topics throughout the lifespan and across many disorders. Perhaps one of the most pressing concerns is how to assess and treat autism spectrum disorder. Our affiliates are very concerned about staying current on evidence-based practices that are appropriate for the various manifestations of deficits associated with ASD. To address this concern on an ongoing basis, each year the January issue of Perspectives on Language Learning and Education is devoted to ASD. At the 2015 ASHA Convention, SIG 1 will sponsor a short course and invited session related to ASD, and a SIG 1 representative will serve on the 2015 Convention Topic Planning Committee for ASD.
What upcoming events related to or sponsored by SIG 1 should everyone know about?
Every year—usually the second Tuesday in October—SIG 1 sponsors a web chat that is open to all ASHA members. This year’s web chat is “From Early Literacy to Accomplished Writers: A Current Conversation”. A panel of experts will address participants’ concerns related to learning how to write and then writing well.
We are also very excited about our sponsored 2014 ASHA Convention offerings. Douglas Peterson from the University of Wyoming will present the three-hour SIG 1 short course (SC 19), “Progress Monitoring of Oral Language: SLPs Taking the Lead and Closing the Gap,” on Friday, Nov. 21, at 1:30 p.m. This session will train SLPs on a narrative language tool that can be used for a single caseload or an entire school district. In addition, we are sponsoring an invited session, “Language in Body and Mind in Autism Spectrum Disorders,” with Inge-Marie Eigsti, a cognitive psychologist from the University of Connecticut. This session (#1309) will emphasize multi-domain abilities that constrain pragmatic language, as well as Eigsti’s research on “optimal outcomes”—children with ASD whose deficits normalize by adolescence. Eigsti will present her two-hour session on Friday, November 21 at 8 a.m.
Which of your recent Perspectives articles is a must-read for CSD professionals, and why?
An article in our July 2014 issue, “Dyslexia: Why Is This Diagnosis so Challenging?” by Linda Lombardino and Laurie Gauger, is a timely, practical and compelling discussion about one of the most common language-related deficits—one that affects individuals throughout their lives. In addition to examining dyslexia’s multifaceted characteristics, the authors describe diagnostic profiles of three students who manifest this disorder differently. SLPs who work with children and adults who have reading difficulties will certainly want to read this thought-provoking overview.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
October 2014
Volume 19, Issue 10