New Bilingual Task Tests Kids’ Speech Perception Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill developed a task to evaluate children’s English and Spanish speech perception abilities in noise or competing speech maskers, described in the June 2014 American Journal of Audiology. The results suggest the stimuli and task are appropriate for speech recognition testing ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   October 01, 2014
New Bilingual Task Tests Kids’ Speech Perception
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   October 01, 2014
New Bilingual Task Tests Kids’ Speech Perception
The ASHA Leader, October 2014, Vol. 19, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.19102014.14
The ASHA Leader, October 2014, Vol. 19, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.19102014.14
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill developed a task to evaluate children’s English and Spanish speech perception abilities in noise or competing speech maskers, described in the June 2014 American Journal of Audiology. The results suggest the stimuli and task are appropriate for speech recognition testing in both languages, providing audiologists with a more conventional measure of speech-in-noise perception as well as a measure of complex listening.
A team led by Lauren Calandruccio tested eight bilingual Spanish-English and eight age-matched monolingual English children (ages 4.9–16.4 years) in a sound-isolated room, each sitting at a desk with a computer monitor. Researchers first played recordings of the target words to let each child get familiar with them—30 disyllabic English and Spanish words, all familiar to 5-year-olds and easily illustrated, such as “tiger/tigre” and “ruler/regla.” Bilingual Spanish-English talkers speaking simultaneously provided the target speech stimuli recordings. Competing stimuli included two people speaking either English or Spanish—the same as the target language—and spectrally matched noise.
The children listened to the target words in the presence of competing noise and speech, and for each had to choose the correct picture from four shown on the screen. Recording their success rates allowed the authors to adaptively estimate masked speech reception thresholds. Both groups of children—regardless of test language—performed significantly worse for the two-talker than for the noise-masker condition. Researchers found no difference in performance between bilingual and monolingual children, but bilingual children performed significantly better in English than in Spanish in competing speech. For all listening conditions, performance improved with increasing age.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
October 2014
Volume 19, Issue 10