October 2014 Aquiles Iglesias has been appointed founding director of the new speech-language pathology program at the University of Delaware—the first in the state—projected to begin accepting students in fall 2016. Prior to this position, Iglesias was a professor at Temple University, where he served as chair of the Department of ... People
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People  |   October 01, 2014
October 2014
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ASHA News & Member Stories / People
People   |   October 01, 2014
October 2014
The ASHA Leader, October 2014, Vol. 19, 18-19. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.19102014.18
The ASHA Leader, October 2014, Vol. 19, 18-19. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.19102014.18
Appointed
Aquiles Iglesias has been appointed founding director of the new speech-language pathology program at the University of Delaware—the first in the state—projected to begin accepting students in fall 2016. Prior to this position, Iglesias was a professor at Temple University, where he served as chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and dean of the Temple University Graduate School.
Awarded
Jane Fraser, president of The Stuttering Foundation since 1981, received an Honorary Fellowship from the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists, based in the United Kingdom. Fraser was selected for her distinguished service in promoting the profession of speech-language pathology.
In the News
Three ASHA members appeared in a Columbus Dispatch story (July 27) about childhood stuttering. Andrea Boerger, a speech-language pathologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio; Diane C. Games, a Cincinnati, Ohio-area SLP and coordinator of ASHA Special Interest Group 4, Fluency and Fluency Disorders; and Sue Schmidlin, an SLP and assistant professor at the University of Cincinnati, were quoted and gave tips for when parents should seek professional help.
Deaths
Jerry V. Tobias, 84, on May 27, 2014. Tobias received his master’s degree from the University of Iowa and a PhD in communication sciences and disorders from Case Western Reserve University. He also earned an MBA from the University of Oklahoma. An internationally recognized scientist, Tobias first joined the faculty of the University of Texas, Austin, then directed the Federal Aviation Administration Communication Processes Research Department. In the final decades of his career, Tobias served in several positions with the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Defense, including director of the Auditory and Communication Sciences Department. During his career, Tobias taught at many organizations and schools, including the Graduate School of the City University of New York. He was one of three founding members of the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise and a charter member of the International Society for Psychophysics; he wrote the constitutions for and served on the Executive Committee of both. An ASHA Fellow and Honors recipient, Tobias was president of the International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem and was ASHA’s liaison to the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise and to noise congresses. Tobias is survived by his daughters, Patricia Tobias and Wendy Merckel.
Robin Parker, 50, on July 16, 2014, in Plantation, Florida. Parker completed her undergraduate and master’s work in speech-language pathology at Florida State University, and earned her SLPD at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. She served as the director of the University of Miami-NSU Center for Autism and Related Disabilities and was a program professor at NSU. Parker is survived by her husband, Glenn; daughter, Sarah; and son, Michael.
Donald T. Counihan, 86, on July 27, 2014, in Tucson, Arizona. Counihan earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in speech-language pathology at Northwestern University. Following military service at Letterman Army Hospital, he served for 40 years in many leadership roles in his profession and in graduate education. Counihan was head of the speech-language pathology program at the University of Oklahoma, where he established the Cleft Palate Clinic and chaired the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders for 14 years. He served twice as chair of the Faculty Senate, received the Regents Award for his contributions to the university, and was Regents Professor Emeritus. An ASHA Honors recipient, Counihan held several ASHA leadership positions, including assistant editor of the Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders; chair of the Committee on Governmental Affairs and the national Clinical Certification Board; and vice president for administration. As chair of ASHA’s Committee on Association and Housing and Investment, he played a key role in purchasing property for the current ASHA national office and was the inaugural recipient of ASHA’s Outstanding Service Award. Counihan chaired the American Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, was a founder and first president of the Oklahoma Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and served on the Editorial Review Board of the American Journal of Otolaryngology. Survivors include his wife, Marylin; children, Thomas, Kathleen Counihan Sublette and Eileen Taft; and sisters, Joan Miller and Geraldine Mercurio.
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October 2014
Volume 19, Issue 10