Classroom-Quieting Efforts Move Forward Two initiatives that would reduce noise pollution in American classrooms made progress this summer. A bill introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives in July allows federal funds for new school construction to be used for “measures designed to reduce or eliminate human exposure to classroom noise and environmental noise ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   October 01, 2014
Classroom-Quieting Efforts Move Forward
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / School-Based Settings / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   October 01, 2014
Classroom-Quieting Efforts Move Forward
The ASHA Leader, October 2014, Vol. 19, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.19102014.10
The ASHA Leader, October 2014, Vol. 19, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.19102014.10
Two initiatives that would reduce noise pollution in American classrooms made progress this summer.
A bill introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives in July allows federal funds for new school construction to be used for “measures designed to reduce or eliminate human exposure to classroom noise and environmental noise pollution.”
ASHA staff worked with Rep. Jared Huffman of California, who introduced the bill, to make sure it included the reference to classroom acoustics. H.R. 5259, the Investing for Tomorrow’s Schools Act of 2014, was referred to the House Education and the Workforce Committee for further consideration.
In the past 20 years, Congress has dealt with many other similar bills that would establish a federal school construction grant program. ASHA has worked with the sponsors of these earlier bills to ensure that funds could be used for noise reduction.
To send a message to your congressional representative in support of H.R. 5259, visit http://takeaction.asha.org.
Acceptance of classroom acoustics into international building codes continues to make slow progress. The International Code Council’s A117.1 Accessibility Committee met in July to consider public comments on amendments to the accessibility building code, including an amendment that specifies classroom acoustics standards. The A117.1 building code, which puts into practice the accessibility mandates required by the Americans With Disabilities Act, has no guidance or requirements on noise and reverberation rates for schools and classrooms.
The International Building Codes are a complete set of comprehensive, coordinated building safety and fire prevention codes. The ICC codes have been adopted by all 50 states and the District of Columbia.
The A117.1 committee will solicit public comments again in early fall 2014 and finalize the draft code in early 2015.
For updates on school construction, disability, noise and related information, follow the ASHA-sponsored Classroom Noise and Acoustics Coalition Facebook page.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
October 2014
Volume 19, Issue 10