More on Stuttering and Suicide Good grief. Did you even read, much less think about, your response to Jane Fraser’s letter “Troubled by Stuttering Article” (August 2014, on.asha.org/fraser-letter)? It is offensive to think that I need to be told that speech-language and hearing clients may be among those who commit suicide worldwide every year. I ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   October 01, 2014
More on Stuttering and Suicide
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Inbox
Inbox   |   October 01, 2014
More on Stuttering and Suicide
The ASHA Leader, October 2014, Vol. 19, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.19102014.5
The ASHA Leader, October 2014, Vol. 19, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.19102014.5
Good grief. Did you even read, much less think about, your response to Jane Fraser’s letter “Troubled by Stuttering Article” (August 2014, on.asha.org/fraser-letter)? It is offensive to think that I need to be told that speech-language and hearing clients may be among those who commit suicide worldwide every year. I believe I have enough insight and compassion to realize that. ASHA has gotten so preachy and socially oversensitive that it has lost all traces of common sense and faith in its members. I suppose the other points Ms. Fraser raised in her letter were deemed unworthy of a response. What a sad representation of this profession ASHA is becoming.
Cindy Cobb, Farmville, North Carolina

Thank you for writing and sharing your perspective on the response to Jane Fraser’s letter. The intent of the response was to clarify that the article did not suggest a link between stuttering and mental illness and suicide—in fact, the article explicitly stated that there is no research to indicate any such relationship.

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FROM THIS ISSUE
October 2014
Volume 19, Issue 10