Spotlight on Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues How many affiliates does SIG 16 have? As of July 31, SIG 16 has 6,176 affiliates. Why did you originally choose to affiliate with SIG 16? When I attended the first State Education Advocacy Leaders training in 1999, people were discussing the potential of a new school committee. I have ... SIG Spotlight
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SIG Spotlight  |   September 01, 2014
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues
Author Notes
  • Laura Young-Campbell, MS, CCC-SLP, SIG 16 coordinator, works in the Mat-Su Borough School District in Alaska, and is a clinical supervisor and instructor for the University of Alaska’s graduate speech clinic. laurayc@yahoo.com
    Laura Young-Campbell, MS, CCC-SLP, SIG 16 coordinator, works in the Mat-Su Borough School District in Alaska, and is a clinical supervisor and instructor for the University of Alaska’s graduate speech clinic. laurayc@yahoo.com×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / ASHA News & Member Stories / SIG Spotlight
SIG Spotlight   |   September 01, 2014
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues
The ASHA Leader, September 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.19092014.np
The ASHA Leader, September 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.19092014.np
How many affiliates does SIG 16 have?
As of July 31, SIG 16 has 6,176 affiliates.
Why did you originally choose to affiliate with SIG 16?
When I attended the first State Education Advocacy Leaders training in 1999, people were discussing the potential of a new school committee. I have always been an advocate for school providers and our services, so I was excited about this new possibility. In 2000, SIG 16 (formerly Special Interest Division 16) became a reality and I signed up immediately. The purpose has always been to focus on school-based issues, giving school providers a voice and increasing our visibility at the national level.
Since SIG 16’s inception, I have been rewarded by the support and collegiality of the affiliates and leadership SIG 16 has offered. We want SIG 16 affiliates to have their voices heard, in addition to providing them continuing education and volunteer opportunities throughout the year.
To paraphrase Judy Rudebusch, ASHA is our “professional home” but SIG 16 is our comfortable place—our “den.” We come here to connect with our school-based friends and colleagues, to find resources, and to give and receive validation as school-based providers. Welcome home.
What is the most important issue surrounding your SIG’s subject matter right now?
With the beginning of the school year these issues are at the top of the list: adoption of and implementation of the Common Core State Standards, workload/caseload, service delivery options, and advocacy. With advocacy, we are concerned with issues related to public awareness and perception of our profession, the erosion of tenure, and pay-for-performance based on student assessments and evaluation.
What upcoming events related to or sponsored by SIG 16 should everyone know about?
Start thinking about who you will nominate for the 2015 Certificate of Recognition for Outstanding Contributions in Preschool-Grade 12 Education Settings. We are very happy to have this award for our school-based SLPs and audiologists.
Attend our fall Web event—co-sponsored with SIG 11, Administration and Supervision—Mentoring Clinical Fellows in Schools: Welcoming the Challenge.
Although not officially sponsored by SIG 16, we also recommend these Web events:
SIG 16’s sponsored events at the 2014 ASHA Convention include a seminar, “Mixing it Up: Designing and Delivering Creative and Effective Services,” and a short course—co-sponsored with SIG 18, Telepractice—titled “Practical Strategies for Implementing and Managing a School-Based Telepractice Program in a Rural School.”
Which of your recent Perspectives articles is a must-read for CSD professionals, and why?
SIG 16 encourages its affiliates to be more proactive in collaborating with their school teams. With active collaboration, we work toward solving problems, meeting students’ needs and self-advocacy. Whether you work in schools or with school-based providers, collaboration is essential for student success. We recommend “Facilitating Cohesive Service Delivery Through Collaboration”, by Marva Mount, in the March 2014 issue of Perspectives on School-Based Issues.
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September 2014
Volume 19, Issue 9