Review Calls for Alzheimer’s Drug Development Researchers have conducted the first-ever analysis of clinical trials for medications for Alzheimer’s disease, which they say reveals an urgent need to cultivate more treatment agents. The results were published July 3 in Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy. Using the advanced search mechanisms of ClinicalTrials.gov—a government website that records all ongoing ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   September 01, 2014
Review Calls for Alzheimer’s Drug Development
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Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   September 01, 2014
Review Calls for Alzheimer’s Drug Development
The ASHA Leader, September 2014, Vol. 19, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19092014.18
The ASHA Leader, September 2014, Vol. 19, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19092014.18
Researchers have conducted the first-ever analysis of clinical trials for medications for Alzheimer’s disease, which they say reveals an urgent need to cultivate more treatment agents. The results were published July 3 in Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy.
Using the advanced search mechanisms of ClinicalTrials.gov—a government website that records all ongoing clinical trials—Jeffrey L. Cummings, director of the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, and his colleagues constructed a comprehensive analysis of all trials since 2002. They discovered that there are relatively few drugs in development for Alzheimer’s disease. Compounding the problem, the failure rate for Alzheimer’s drug development is 99.6 percent for the decade 2002–2012, and the overall number of drugs in development has been declining since 2009.
An estimated 44 million people live with the condition worldwide. The research team points to a need for more support, growth and coordination of the AD drug system to improve the success rate for new therapies.
They note a need for more repositioning studies, which examine an already-approved drug in a new use or condition, thus accelerating the drug development process and reducing the need to invent new drugs.
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September 2014
Volume 19, Issue 9