Feds Announce New Special Education Measures The U.S. Department of Education has raised the bar for the education of the country’s 6.5 million children and youth with disabilities by using student performance—rather than states’ compliance with procedures such as timelines for evaluations and due process hearings—to measure states’ special education effectiveness. This change in accountability radically ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   September 01, 2014
Feds Announce New Special Education Measures
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School-Based Settings / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   September 01, 2014
Feds Announce New Special Education Measures
The ASHA Leader, September 2014, Vol. 19, 13. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.19092014.13
The ASHA Leader, September 2014, Vol. 19, 13. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.19092014.13
The U.S. Department of Education has raised the bar for the education of the country’s 6.5 million children and youth with disabilities by using student performance—rather than states’ compliance with procedures such as timelines for evaluations and due process hearings—to measure states’ special education effectiveness.
This change in accountability radically drops the number of states that meet requirements. In 2013, when the ED used compliance data to measure effectiveness, 41 states and territories met requirements. This year, with the inclusion of student performance, only 18 states and territories meet requirements.
Educational outcomes in reading and math, as well as graduation rates, for students with disabilities continue to lag. The new accountability system measures several outcomes, including special education students’ participation in state assessments, proficiency gaps between students with disabilities and all students, and performance in reading and math on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. These factors affect state’s annual determination under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act.
Fewer than 10 percent of the nation’s eighth-graders enrolled in special education are scoring as proficient in reading, according to Michael Yudin, acting assistant secretary for special education and rehabilitative services. The new accountability framework will reward states for implementing evidence-based strategies to improve results and outcomes for students with disabilities.
ASHA’s government relations and public policy staff want to hear from school-based SLPs about how this new framework is affecting—or could potentially affect—them. Please contact Catherine Clarke at cclarke@asha.org with feedback.
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September 2014
Volume 19, Issue 9