The Best and the Brightest I am responding to the recent letter “Recruitment Concerns.” In my 30 years as a professor, we had many faculty conversations about the large number of students accepted in our undergraduate program compared to our graduate program. One solution was to have the university advising center develop a brochure about ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   September 01, 2014
The Best and the Brightest
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Professional Issues & Training / Inbox
Inbox   |   September 01, 2014
The Best and the Brightest
The ASHA Leader, September 2014, Vol. 19, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN3.19092014.6
The ASHA Leader, September 2014, Vol. 19, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN3.19092014.6
I am responding to the recent letter “Recruitment Concerns.” In my 30 years as a professor, we had many faculty conversations about the large number of students accepted in our undergraduate program compared to our graduate program. One solution was to have the university advising center develop a brochure about careers open to people with bachelor’s degrees in communication sciences and disorders. The person who helped create it had a bachelor’s in CSD.
Many health and human service-related jobs are a perfect fit: work in a health insurance agency, jobs in advertising, and selling health-related publications and products. They can also get master’s degrees in other fields with little or no additional preparation beyond the BA. Special education welcomed our students and found most to be exceptional in that program. Other areas like early childhood education, linguistics-related areas, deaf education, psychology, not-for-profit organization management, hospital or education administration are just a few of the possibilities. Our bachelor’s is not a union card for a job, but a basic education for any number of health and human service-related endeavors.
This is no time to discourage students from entering our field. Speech-language pathologists are desperately needed in all settings. Some years ago, the number of students entering our programs dropped and we are still feeling the effects of that shortage.
Medicine, dentistry and nursing make no excuses for taking the best and brightest from their preparation programs to fill the few positions in their professional programs. Why should we?
Colette L. Coleman, Ashland, Oregon

The Leader plans to examine graduate program capacity—and the challenges of expanding it—in 2015.

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September 2014
Volume 19, Issue 9