Study Identifies Cognitive Risk Pattern in Children With Cochlear Implants Children with profound deafness who receive a cochlear implant had as much as five times the risk of having delays in areas of working memory, controlled attention, planning and conceptual learning as children with normal hearing, according to research published May 22 in the Journal of the American Medical Association ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   August 01, 2014
Study Identifies Cognitive Risk Pattern in Children With Cochlear Implants
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Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   August 01, 2014
Study Identifies Cognitive Risk Pattern in Children With Cochlear Implants
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.19082014.np
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.19082014.np
Children with profound deafness who receive a cochlear implant had as much as five times the risk of having delays in areas of working memory, controlled attention, planning and conceptual learning as children with normal hearing, according to research published May 22 in the Journal of the American Medical Association Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. The results are the first from a large-scale study to compare real-world executive functioning behavior in children with cochlear implants and those with normal hearing.
Executive functioning, a set of mental processes involved in regulating and directing thinking and behavior, is important for focusing and attaining goals in daily life. The authors evaluated 73 children implanted before age 7 and 78 children with normal hearing to determine the risk of deficits in executive functioning behaviors in everyday life. All children in the study had average to above-average IQ scores.
Lead author William Kronenberger, professor of clinical psychology at the Indiana University School of Medicine, said that parents and others who work with children with CIs commonly report delays in executive functioning. Based on these observations, his group evaluated whether children with CIs show elevated risks of delays in executive functioning and, if so, what components are affected.
The researchers divided children in the study into two age groups: preschool (3 to 5 years) and school-age (7 to 17 years). Using an established scale, parents rated executive function in everyday life. Preschoolers were implanted at an average age of 18 months, and they had fewer executive function delays than school-age children who were implanted 10 months later, at an average age of 28 months.
“We compared parent ratings and looked at the percentage of children in each group who scored above a cut-off value that indicates at least a mild delay in executive functioning,” Kronenberger says. “In the critical areas of controlled attention, working memory, planning and solving new problems, about 30 to 45 percent of the children with cochlear implants scored above the cut-off value, compared to about 15 percent or less of the children in the normal-hearing sample.”
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August 2014
Volume 19, Issue 8