Behavior Regulation Boosts Vocabulary Behavior regulation predicts vocabulary gain among children with language disorders, according to study findings reported May 19 in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Children with higher behavior regulation gained more new words over the academic year than their peers with lower behavior regulation, the study found. The researchers say ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   August 01, 2014
Behavior Regulation Boosts Vocabulary
Author Notes
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   August 01, 2014
Behavior Regulation Boosts Vocabulary
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, 20. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19082014.20
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, 20. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19082014.20
Behavior regulation predicts vocabulary gain among children with language disorders, according to study findings reported May 19 in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Children with higher behavior regulation gained more new words over the academic year than their peers with lower behavior regulation, the study found. The researchers say the findings highlight how important it is for speech-language pathologists to consider behavior regulation in treatment.
A team led by Mary Beth Schmitt at the Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy at The Ohio State University sought to investigate behavior regulation’s role in vocabulary gain for children receiving language treatment in public schools. They also investigated whether emotional support in treatment sessions had a moderating influence on outcomes. The study included 121 kindergarten and 1st-grade students with language disorders, and 42 SLPs. The researchers used direct child measures, indirect child measures and session videotapes in their analyses.
They found a strong, positive association between children’s behavior regulation and vocabulary gain: For every unit increase above the mean in measures of behavior regulation, a child gained .50 more raw-score points in vocabulary. Emotional support in sessions did not significantly predict vocabulary gain.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2014
Volume 19, Issue 8