Booklet Encourages Science and Tech Careers for Students With Disabilities A new NIH-funded booklet outlines ways to propel more college students with disabilities into science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Available online, “From College to Careers: Fostering Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in STEM” is based on a three-year project led by two Purdue University faculty members, Brad Duerstock, associate professor ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   August 01, 2014
Booklet Encourages Science and Tech Careers for Students With Disabilities
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Professional Issues & Training / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   August 01, 2014
Booklet Encourages Science and Tech Careers for Students With Disabilities
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB4.19082014.17
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB4.19082014.17
A new NIH-funded booklet outlines ways to propel more college students with disabilities into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
Available online, “From College to Careers: Fostering Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in STEM” is based on a three-year project led by two Purdue University faculty members, Brad Duerstock, associate professor of engineering practice and director of the Institute for Accessible Science, and Susan Mendrysa, associate professor of biomedical sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine.
Each of the publication’s four chapters focuses on a specific strategy:
  • Assistive technologies.

  • Interventions to enhance retention, persistence to graduation, and career readiness in students with disabilities, including mentoring and internships.

  • Encouraging stakeholders to use the evidence-based technologies and strategies.

  • Supporting and growing effective programs for long-term success.

“The transition to higher education is when STEM starts to lose students with disabilities,” Duerstock said, so it’s important to share interventions that could help retain students and ultimately help increase the number of people with disabilities working in the life science and engineering fields.
More than two dozen researchers and experts in the field contributed to the booklet, which also incorporates feedback received from invited researchers, college educators, policymakers and program officers from across the country during a two-day workshop in 2013.
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August 2014
Volume 19, Issue 8