Advisory Panel Recommends $4.5 Billion for Brain Research A federal report released in June recommends spending $4.5 billion on the Brain Research through the Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative over the next 12 years to investigate how the brain works. The initiative is part of President Obama’s focus on developing and applying innovative technologies to identify how individual ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   August 01, 2014
Advisory Panel Recommends $4.5 Billion for Brain Research
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Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   August 01, 2014
Advisory Panel Recommends $4.5 Billion for Brain Research
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.19082014.16
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.19082014.16
A federal report released in June recommends spending $4.5 billion on the Brain Research through the Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative over the next 12 years to investigate how the brain works.
The initiative is part of President Obama’s focus on developing and applying innovative technologies to identify how individual brain cells and complex neural circuits interact. Researchers will be able to use this information to identify ways to treat, cure and even prevent brain disorders, and to explore how the brain enables the human body to record, process, use, store and retrieve information.
Four federal agencies lead the initiative: the National Institutes of Health, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency of the Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, and Food and Drug Administration.
The report, drafted by an advisory panel to the NIH director, calls for the new federal funding beginning in fiscal year 2016. NIH committed $40 million in fiscal year 2014 and President Obama’s 2015 budget request includes $100 million for NIH’s component of the initiative.
NIH’s charge will be to map the circuits of the brain, measure the fluctuating patterns of electrical and chemical activity flowing within those circuits, and understand how their interplay creates humans’ unique cognitive and behavioral capabilities.
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August 2014
Volume 19, Issue 8