Master’s Programs and Paperwork I wanted to respond to and amplify Maria Mabe’s letter in the June issue (“Recruitment Concerns,”). She was saying that students with a bachelor’s degree in speech-language pathology had trouble getting into graduate programs. I recently moved from Maine and we had a similar problem. I was an adjunct instructor ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   August 01, 2014
Master’s Programs and Paperwork
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News & Member Stories / Inbox
Inbox   |   August 01, 2014
Master’s Programs and Paperwork
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.19082014.6
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.19082014.6
I wanted to respond to and amplify Maria Mabe’s letter in the June issue (“Recruitment Concerns,”). She was saying that students with a bachelor’s degree in speech-language pathology had trouble getting into graduate programs.
I recently moved from Maine and we had a similar problem. I was an adjunct instructor at a junior college in a two-year speech pathology program, intended to help someone become a speech-language pathology assistant. However, students should have also had the option of going into the university to obtain a bachelor’s and then a master’s. We had an accredited program with excellent students. Almost none of those who applied to the University of Maine—the only public university speech-language pathology program—were accepted. Pathways should be open, not closed. What can ASHA leadership do about this problem?
I also have reservations about encouraging someone to go into speech-language pathology if they are intending to work in the schools. I ask them if they like paperwork. In the 40 years I have been in public school speech therapy in several different states, I have seen the paperwork steadily increase. I realize there has to be some accountability, but it’s just crazy.
I love speech-language pathology and I love my job, but the paperwork burden is overwhelming. What can ASHA leadership do about that?
Susan Zimmerman, Sylva, N.C.

As indicated in response to the June letter, enrollment in CSD master’s programs is limited by a number of factors, including sufficient supervised clinical placements for students, an issue the Leader will explore in 2015. ASHA is working with members of Congress to examine paperwork issues (on.asha.org/paperwork-policies).

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August 2014
Volume 19, Issue 8