Spotlight on Special Interest Division 7, Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation How many affiliates does SIG 7 have? As of June 2014, SIG 7 has 313 affiliates. Why did you originally choose to affiliate with SIG 7? I have been an affiliate of SIG 7 for more than five years, and I have found it to be one of the most ... SIG Spotlight
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SIG Spotlight  |   July 01, 2014
Spotlight on Special Interest Division 7, Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation
Author Notes
  • Kathleen M. Cienkowski, PhD, CCC-A, SIG 7 coordinator, is associate professor and audiology program director in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at the University of Connecticut. cienkowski@uconn.edu
    Kathleen M. Cienkowski, PhD, CCC-A, SIG 7 coordinator, is associate professor and audiology program director in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at the University of Connecticut. cienkowski@uconn.edu×
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / ASHA News & Member Stories / SIG Spotlight
SIG Spotlight   |   July 01, 2014
Spotlight on Special Interest Division 7, Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation
The ASHA Leader, July 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.19072014.np
The ASHA Leader, July 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.19072014.np
How many affiliates does SIG 7 have?
As of June 2014, SIG 7 has 313 affiliates.
Why did you originally choose to affiliate with SIG 7?
I have been an affiliate of SIG 7 for more than five years, and I have found it to be one of the most rewarding benefits of my ASHA membership. I learned about the SIG through its then-coordinator, J. P. Gagne. I was surprised that I knew so little about what the SIG had to offer—educational opportunities, Perspectives, online resources and more. The SIG has been an incredible resource for professional connections and information.
What is the most important issue surrounding SIG 7’s subject matter right now?
Access to affordable hearing health care is a hotly debated topic among professionals. Hearing aids and personal sound amplification products are available online through big-box stores and wholesale clubs. The question is, how will access to these lower-cost hearing devices affect the numbers of people with hearing loss seeking treatment and the quality of services they receive? SIG 7 notes that a device is only one part of effective hearing health care management. The provision of a range of services—including communication and auditory training, speechreading, assistive devices and counseling—are critical to successful hearing loss management. Audiologic rehabilitation is about understanding the consequences of hearing loss in our patients’ daily lives and working collaboratively to develop a management plan. SIG 7 is an important resource for clinicians seeking to provide this type of comprehensive care.
What upcoming events related to or sponsored by SIG 7 should everyone know about?
SIG 7 is sponsoring two events at the upcoming ASHA convention in Orlando. Jaclyn Spitzer from Columbia University, along with René Gifford from Vanderbilt University, will present a short course on new developments in implantable hearing devices. In addition, Michelle Hughes from Boys Town National Research Hospital will present a mini-seminar on “telehabilitation.” Both events promise to provide insightful information in these areas of hearing loss management.
Which of your recent Perspectives articles is a must-read for CSD professionals, and why?
Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation offers many excellent papers for SIG 7 affiliates. Our December 2013 issue includes a paper by Nerina Scarinci and colleagues, “Using a Family-Centered Care Approach in Audiologic Rehabilitation for Adults with Hearing Impairment,” that is a must-read. In keeping with SIG 7’s emphasis on patient-centered care, the article describes the crucial role of family in audiologic rehabilitation for older adults with hearing loss. The paper thoughtfully provides strategies for increased inclusion of family members in the rehabilitation process to promote the reduction of “third-party disability”—the impact of a person’s hearing loss on his or her family.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
July 2014
Volume 19, Issue 7