U.S. Childhood Hearing Loss Underestimated by 7.5 Percent Including immigrant children in counts of undetected childhood hearing loss in the United States could boost the prevalence by 7.5 percent, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Audiology. These new data reinforce the importance of early hearing loss detection, which can result ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   July 01, 2014
U.S. Childhood Hearing Loss Underestimated by 7.5 Percent
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   July 01, 2014
U.S. Childhood Hearing Loss Underestimated by 7.5 Percent
The ASHA Leader, July 2014, Vol. 19, 13. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19072014.13
The ASHA Leader, July 2014, Vol. 19, 13. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19072014.13
Including immigrant children in counts of undetected childhood hearing loss in the United States could boost the prevalence by 7.5 percent, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Audiology. These new data reinforce the importance of early hearing loss detection, which can result in more accurate estimation of childhood hearing loss rates and better intervention program planning.
A team led by Lindsay Pape of Missouri State University in Springfield culled information from online search engines and peer-reviewed journals—using the most recent sources available—and organized the results by emigrating country. Adding immigrant children only from Mexico and China presents a 7.5 percent increase in the total number of children in the United States with hearing loss. Given government estimates of the rising number of immigrant children entering the country with hearing loss, the percentage may be even greater—but the true prevalence may be almost impossible to obtain, the authors say.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
July 2014
Volume 19, Issue 7