Study Further Debunks Autism-Vaccine Link An international review of 10 studies that involved more than 1.25 million children concludes there is no association between autism and any of six vaccines or two vaccine preservatives. University of Sydney scientists led by Guy Eslick debunked the link, which was originally suggested by a now-discredited 1998 study that ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   July 01, 2014
Study Further Debunks Autism-Vaccine Link
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   July 01, 2014
Study Further Debunks Autism-Vaccine Link
The ASHA Leader, July 2014, Vol. 19, 9. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.19072014.9
The ASHA Leader, July 2014, Vol. 19, 9. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.19072014.9
An international review of 10 studies that involved more than 1.25 million children concludes there is no association between autism and any of six vaccines or two vaccine preservatives.
University of Sydney scientists led by Guy Eslick debunked the link, which was originally suggested by a now-discredited 1998 study that has since been retracted. The findings of the review were published in the journal Vaccine.
“The data consistently show the lack of evidence for an association between autism, autism spectrum disorders and childhood vaccinations, regardless of whether the intervention was through combination vaccines or one of its components, providing no reason to avoid immunization on these grounds,” Eslick said.
The five cohort studies and five case-control studies found no association between autism and immunizations for measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, tetanus or whooping cough, and the preservatives thimerosal and mercury. Despite similar findings that vaccines are not associated with ASD in reports backed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Institute of Medicine, many parents remain skeptical.
A recent Harris Poll survey found that one in three parents continue to believe that vaccines can cause autism, despite the link being widely discredited by the scientific community. In the poll of 1,756 adults, 29 percent agreed that immunizations can lead to ASD. Among those with children under the age of 18, that number rose to 33 percent.
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July 2014
Volume 19, Issue 7