Hurricane of Bubbles The school year was wrapping up at Central Primary School in Gonzales, La. My fellow SLPs and I treated our students who have limited verbal skills to an end-of-the-school-year blowout outdoors. We played simple requesting and turn-taking games, slurped on popsicles and, of course, blew bubbles. Our students could ... Glimpses
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Glimpses  |   July 01, 2014
Hurricane of Bubbles
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / School-Based Settings / Glimpses
Glimpses   |   July 01, 2014
Hurricane of Bubbles
The ASHA Leader, July 2014, Vol. 19, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.19072014.6
The ASHA Leader, July 2014, Vol. 19, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.19072014.6
The school year was wrapping up at Central Primary School in Gonzales, La. My fellow SLPs and I treated our students who have limited verbal skills to an end-of-the-school-year blowout outdoors. We played simple requesting and turn-taking games, slurped on popsicles and, of course, blew bubbles. Our students could hardly bear the excitement that came next—a bubble “hurricane” machine. Along with uncontrollable giggling, the activity resulted in lots of language expression and was the most fun we’ve ever had with a “hurricane” here. I use bubbles year round to establish forward airflow, facilitate lip rounding, work on turn-taking, and produce /b/, /p/ or /m/ (Bubbles! Pop! More!). They motivate my little ones to verbally request, sign or use their communication systems to keep those bubbles coming. I wholeheartedly believe that speech-language treatment should be not only effective but also irresistibly engaging—fun activities get everyone’s communicative juices flowing!
About me: Little did I know that my first job 18 years ago would become my forever job. I work with children ages 3 to 12 in Ascension Parish Public Schools and I love the challenge, variety and sense of community of working in a public school. I also have private clients. One of my favorite things is working with preschoolers and watching them grow into little communicators who no longer need me. Those same students are now bringing their children to me for treatment. When I’m not working or just hanging with my little Cajun family, I am reading, crocheting, DIY-ing, making treatment materials or blogging. I am a self-proclaimed word nerd and my blog is the perfect way to unite my love of words and writing and my love for all things speech and language.
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July 2014
Volume 19, Issue 7