Health Reforms Spur Better Practices in China Capitation—in which managed care organizations pay health care providers a set fee per enrolled patient—combined with pay-for-performance measures led to a reduction of almost 15 percent in antibiotic prescriptions and a small decline in total spending per visit to community clinics in rural China, according to a study published in ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   June 01, 2014
Health Reforms Spur Better Practices in China
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Professional Issues & Training / International & Global / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   June 01, 2014
Health Reforms Spur Better Practices in China
The ASHA Leader, June 2014, Vol. 19, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19062014.16
The ASHA Leader, June 2014, Vol. 19, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19062014.16
Capitation—in which managed care organizations pay health care providers a set fee per enrolled patient—combined with pay-for-performance measures led to a reduction of almost 15 percent in antibiotic prescriptions and a small decline in total spending per visit to community clinics in rural China, according to a study published in the March 2014 issue of Health Affairs.
Although pay-for-performance—reimbursing health care providers based on the results they achieved with their patients as a way to improve quality and efficiency—has become a major component of health reforms in the United States, United Kingdom and other affluent countries, there has been little evaluation of its impact. Between 2009 and 2012, the authors—led by Winnie Yip of the University of Oxford, U.K., and in collaboration with the Ningxia Province government—reviewed that province’s primary care providers’ antibiotic-prescribing practices, health spending and several other factors.
The success of this experiment has motivated the government of Ningxia Province to expand this intervention to the entire province. “From a policy perspective, our study offers several additional valuable lessons,” the authors say. “Provider patterns of overprescribing and inappropriate prescribing cannot be changed overnight; nor can patient demand, for which antibiotics are synonymous with quality care. Provider payment reform probably needs to be accompanied by training for providers and health education for patients.”
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June 2014
Volume 19, Issue 6