Recruitment Concerns As Better Speech and Hearing Month approaches, I have the following concerns regarding recruiting members to our profession. I am not sure I want to recommend young men and women enter the speech-language pathology profession when I know many individuals with bachelor’s degrees in speech-language pathology cannot get into graduate ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   June 01, 2014
Recruitment Concerns
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Inbox
Inbox   |   June 01, 2014
Recruitment Concerns
The ASHA Leader, June 2014, Vol. 19, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.19062014.4
The ASHA Leader, June 2014, Vol. 19, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.19062014.4
As Better Speech and Hearing Month approaches, I have the following concerns regarding recruiting members to our profession. I am not sure I want to recommend young men and women enter the speech-language pathology profession when I know many individuals with bachelor’s degrees in speech-language pathology cannot get into graduate school.
Does ASHA have any data on how many graduates of bachelor degree programs are sitting on the sidelines because they cannot get into graduate school? Do these students need to apply to every graduate school in the country because the schools in their own state have graduate programs that are filled? To me, if one obtains a bachelor’s degree in speech-language pathology then an automatic admission to any graduate school in the country should be given.
I would love answers to these questions because right now, I am on the fence whether or not to recommend the field to high school students. I know a shortage exists, but if students can’t get into graduate school when they have successfully completed a bachelor’s program, then why bother?
Maria Mabe, Avon, Ind.

ASHA collects data from programs on the number of applications they receive and the number they accept. For a discussion of graduate school applications, visit on.asha.org/grad-applications. Enrollment is limited by a number of factors, including sufficient supervised clinical placements for students, an issue the Leader will explore in 2015.

2 Comments
June 3, 2014
Haley Huckabee
entitlement?
Maybe this would solve a shortage problem, but can you imagine being in a graduate program with 100 students instead of 20-25? How would you find clinical placements for everyone? If everyone gets in, we would end up with an entire population of mediocre SLPs instead of a few really good ones. How about working hard as an undergrad to compete to get into the program you want? And if you don't get in, you apply to another. And if you don't get in, you apply again the next year. I mean seriously, should we get a cookie and trophy just for participating too?
June 3, 2014
Kristen Miller
perfect fit
I recently recommended our profession to a high-school graduate. She is super excited to major in our profession, and I couldn't agree more, she is a perfect fit. I'd suggest making recommendations based on the facts telling a high-school student interested in the profession exactly as it is. The student should be very good student who seriously plans on excelling at college with at least a 3.5+. The student should plan on participating in extra curricular activities geared toward helping people/communities, volunteerism, and/ or seek employment options in hospital/daycare/schools to add gainful experience as a boost on their graduate application. The person should be a people oriented person who is not afraid of the idea of being a major force of change in another person's life. The person should have a strong desire to help others, be organized, insightful, kind, compassionate, mentally strong, socially adept. Despite having all these fine qualities the person should also be prepared to move far away to receive all the necessary training. Graduate school is very competitive and most schools accept only a very limited number of applicants. While graduate assistantships are possible you should not count on anything being you will likely have to move to a new school with unfamiliar faculty. An adventurous spirit with a confident disposition seems ideal here. It do not think it would be a good idea to water down our profession with the idea of entitlement despite any SLP shortages. I would prefer only the best and the brightest of slp2b's channeling through academics. This is simply not the profession for a mediocre or average student. Their is too much science, skill, and art required of a speech-language pathologist......
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June 2014
Volume 19, Issue 6