Not Flattering to Audiologists “Yes, I Can Hear You Now” (April 2014) should’ve been retitled “Yes, I Can Hear You Now, but it wasn’t the audiologist who helped me.” While Ms. Raymonda’s hearing journey is one of hope and certainly very interesting, I was quite dismayed at its negative portrayal of audiology’s role in ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   June 01, 2014
Not Flattering to Audiologists
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Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Inbox
Inbox   |   June 01, 2014
Not Flattering to Audiologists
The ASHA Leader, June 2014, Vol. 19, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.19062014.4
The ASHA Leader, June 2014, Vol. 19, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.19062014.4
“Yes, I Can Hear You Now” (April 2014) should’ve been retitled “Yes, I Can Hear You Now, but it wasn’t the audiologist who helped me.” While Ms. Raymonda’s hearing journey is one of hope and certainly very interesting, I was quite dismayed at its negative portrayal of audiology’s role in her treatment. After her failed stapedectomy, Ms. Raymonda outlines the numerous problems with her hearing aid (trouble in background noise, feedback, etc.), only to find better hearing through the success of a second surgery.
Yes, the surgical correction of her otosclerosis is a medical marvel, but I do not think this story provided a flattering representation of her colleagues on the hearing side of our shared field. Was Ms. Raymonda properly counseled on realistic expectations for unilateral hearing loss (yes, of course background noise is difficult)? Obviously, I do not know the nature or severity of her hearing loss, but the vast majority of my patients (even with severe loss) have success on the phone and minimal feedback concerns when properly fit (using real-ear verification).
I do not discredit what she personally experienced, but only the Leader’s choice to include this story. Would you have included a parallel story of an audiologist who developed a voice disorder, attended weeks of failed therapy by an SLP, but finally, oh finally, recovered her voice after getting Botox injections by a physician?
Patricia O. Johnson, Chapel Hill, N.C.

First Person on the Last Page gives all ASHA members—regardless of profession—the opportunity to tell stories from their own perspective that demonstrate interconnections between their personal and professional lives. Thanks for your comments.

1 Comment
June 26, 2014
Maureen McCarron
Positive Stories Please!
I agree with Patricia O. Johnson of Chapel Hill, N.C. who objected to the editor's choice of "Yes, I Can Hear You Now..." story. Many of us who have practiced for more than a few years may have a collection of less than stellar results, but none of us want those stories posted prominently in our own association's publication. ASHA, you have done better in the past with this feature. In the future, cast your net wider to get positive stories!
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June 2014
Volume 19, Issue 6