Speaking of Snacks I’ve always loved coming up with engaging activities—using items readily available around the house—that parents can expand on at home to bolster speech and language skills in everyday environments. I recently included my daughter’s toy fruits and vegetables in treatment sessions. They are soft, inexpensive and easily washable, making ... Glimpses
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Glimpses  |   June 01, 2014
Speaking of Snacks
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Glimpses
Glimpses   |   June 01, 2014
Speaking of Snacks
The ASHA Leader, June 2014, Vol. 19, 8. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.19062014.8
The ASHA Leader, June 2014, Vol. 19, 8. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.19062014.8
I’ve always loved coming up with engaging activities—using items readily available around the house—that parents can expand on at home to bolster speech and language skills in everyday environments. I recently included my daughter’s toy fruits and vegetables in treatment sessions. They are soft, inexpensive and easily washable, making them practical yet highly functional manipulatives. I filled a basket with these brightly colored foods and had my speech buddies work on identifying categories, using descriptive language, building sentences with target words, and pretend play. For phonological practice, kids were clapping, jumping and stomping out the syllables in multisyllabic words (watermelon, bell pepper, pineapple, tomato). To enrich the exercise, I asked parents to bring their kiddos into the kitchen during dinner prep for some speech practice. This activity not only helps strengthen communication skills, it also encourages kids to get that extra serving of fruits and veggies!
About me: I’m an SLP born, raised and practicing in Los Angeles. After a few highly gratifying years working in public schools, I opened my own practice. My caseload is mostly preschoolers through fifth-graders. I love to create effective, interactive and fun techniques to get kids excited about speech: I’ve done everything from including the family dog in articulation practice to getting elbow-deep in spaghetti to find the “buried treasure.” Much of my inspiration comes from playing with my 18-month-old daughter and all the incredible kids I have the pleasure of working with.
Lia Mantel Krief, MS, CCC-SLP. talkintimespeech@gmail.com
@talkintime talkINtime Speech
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June 2014
Volume 19, Issue 6